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The Role of Policy Makers and Institutions in the Energy Sector: The Case of Energy Infrastructure Governance in Nigeria

Author

Listed:
  • Norbert Edomah

    () (Global Sustainability Institute, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK
    Information Systems Academy, Pan-Atlantic University, Lagos, Nigeria)

  • Chris Foulds

    () (Global Sustainability Institute, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK)

  • Aled Jones

    () (Global Sustainability Institute, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK)

Abstract

This paper focuses on investigating the linkages and consequences of the policy decision process in the governance of energy infrastructure in Nigeria. It attempts to gain a better understanding of the role of policy makers and institutions in the provision of energy infrastructure in Nigeria. Using a combination of semi-structured interviews and documentary evidences from published literature, this study reveals three essential areas where the policy-making processes (and therefore policy makers) intervene in the provision of energy infrastructure. These are: (1) granting access to historical data; (2) regulations; and (3) permitting/issuance of licenses. This study also reveals three major unintended consequences of the policy decision processes and institutions in the governance of energy infrastructure provisions in Nigeria, which are: (1) government financing corruption in the energy sector; (2) economic delusion; and (3) uncontrolled growth in energy demand driven more by export and not local internal demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Norbert Edomah & Chris Foulds & Aled Jones, 2016. "The Role of Policy Makers and Institutions in the Energy Sector: The Case of Energy Infrastructure Governance in Nigeria," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(8), pages 1-1, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:8:p:829-:d:76460
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Florini, Ann & Sovacool, Benjamin K., 2009. "Who governs energy? The challenges facing global energy governance," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5239-5248, December.
    2. Stern, David I., 2010. "The Role of Energy in Economic Growth," Working Papers 249380, Australian National University, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy.
    3. Cherp, Aleh & Jewell, Jessica, 2014. "The concept of energy security: Beyond the four As," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 415-421.
    4. Navarro, Adoracion M. & Sambodo, Maxensius Tri, 2013. "The Pathway to ASEAN Energy Market Integration," Discussion Papers DP 2013-49, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    5. David I. Stern and Astrid Kander, 2012. "The Role of Energy in the Industrial Revolution and Modern Economic Growth," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    6. Norbert Edomah & Chris Foulds & Aled Jones, 2016. "Energy Transitions in Nigeria: The Evolution of Energy Infrastructure Provision (1800–2015)," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(7), pages 1-1, June.
    7. Scott, Christopher A. & Pierce, Suzanne A. & Pasqualetti, Martin J. & Jones, Alice L. & Montz, Burrell E. & Hoover, Joseph H., 2011. "Policy and institutional dimensions of the water-energy nexus," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 6622-6630, October.
    8. David Onyinyechi Agu & Evelyn Nwamaka & Ogbeide Osaretin, 2016. "An inquiry into the political economy of the global clean energy transition policies and Nigeria's federal and state governments' fiscal policies," WIDER Working Paper Series 031, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Bale, Catherine S.E. & Varga, Liz & Foxon, Timothy J., 2015. "Energy and complexity: New ways forward," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 150-159.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Edomah, Norbert & Foulds, Chris & Jones, Aled, 2017. "Policy making and energy infrastructure change: A Nigerian case study of energy governance in the electricity sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 476-485.
    2. Gungah, Aarti & Emodi, Nnaemeka Vincent & Dioha, Michael O., 2019. "Improving Nigeria's renewable energy policy design: A case study approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 89-100.
    3. Aliyu Salisu Barau & Aliyu Haidar Abubakar & Abdul-Hakim Ibrahim Kiyawa, 2020. "Not There Yet: Mapping Inhibitions to Solar Energy Utilisation by Households in African Informal Urban Neighbourhoods," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-1, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    energy economics; energy governance; public policy; developing countries; Nigeria; sustainable energy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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