IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jsusta/v7y2014i1p56-74d43865.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Impact of Industrial Transformation on Water Use Efficiency in Northwest Region of China

Author

Listed:
  • Qingling Shi

    () (China Center for Economic Studies, School of Economics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China
    These authors contributed equally to this work.)

  • Shiyi Chen

    () (China Center for Economic Studies, School of Economics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China
    These authors contributed equally to this work.)

  • Chenchen Shi

    () (State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
    These authors contributed equally to this work.)

  • Zhan Wang

    () (Institute of Geographic and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
    Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
    These authors contributed equally to this work.)

  • Xiangzheng Deng

    () (Institute of Geographic and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
    Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
    These authors contributed equally to this work.)

Abstract

China has been stressing the needs of promoting regional sustainable development through industrial transformation. In the northwest region of China, which is faced with both urgent socioeconomic development and fragile ecological conditions, with water scarcity being one of the major characters, the relationship between industrial transformation and water use efficiency ought to be investigated. This paper conducted an empirical analysis of industry transformation’s impact on water use efficiency by using the Input-output analysis. First, we compiled an extended Input-output table with water use account; Second, the input-output analysis model was built based on the extended Input-output table; Then, a counterfactual experiment was performed to document the water use efficiency caused by industrial transformation; Finally, water use efficiency of different sectors in both northwest region of China as a whole and its five provinces were calculated. The results show that water use efficiency of northwest region of China is improved by optimizing industrial structure. Also, sectors with low water use efficiency but huge improvement potential were found out. Then policy implications for regional sustainable development and water resources management are provided at the end of the article.

Suggested Citation

  • Qingling Shi & Shiyi Chen & Chenchen Shi & Zhan Wang & Xiangzheng Deng, 2014. "The Impact of Industrial Transformation on Water Use Efficiency in Northwest Region of China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:7:y:2014:i:1:p:56-74:d:43865
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/7/1/56/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/7/1/56/
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Matthias Brachert & Mirko Titze & Alexander Kubis, 2011. "Identifying industrial clusters from a multidimensional perspective: Methodical aspects with an application to Germany," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 90(2), pages 419-439, June.
    2. Kofi Adom, Philip & Bekoe, William & Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin & Mensah, Justice Tei & Botchway, Ebo, 2012. "Carbon dioxide emissions, economic growth, industrial structure, and technical efficiency: Empirical evidence from Ghana, Senegal, and Morocco on the causal dynamics," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 314-325.
    3. Kang, Yaohu & Wang, Ruoshui & Wan, Shuqin & Hu, Wei & Jiang, Shufang & Liu, Shiping, 2012. "Effects of different water levels on cotton growth and water use through drip irrigation in an arid region with saline ground water of Northwest China," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 117-126.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rongrong Xu & Yongxiang Wu & Gaoxu Wang & Xuan Zhang & Wei Wu & Zan Xu, 2019. "Evaluation of industrial water use efficiency considering pollutant discharge in China," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(8), pages 1-22, August.
    2. Chao Bao & Dongmei He, 2015. "The Causal Relationship between Urbanization, Economic Growth and Water Use Change in Provincial China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(12), pages 1-10, December.
    3. Ke-Liang Wang & Jianguo Wang & Jianming Wang & Lili Ding & Mingsong Zhao & Qunwei Wang, 2020. "Investigating the spatiotemporal differences and influencing factors of green water use efficiency of Yangtze River Economic Belt in China," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(4), pages 1-24, April.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Samargandi, Nahla, 2017. "Sector value addition, technology and CO2 emissions in Saudi Arabia," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 868-877.
    2. Dong Jichang & He Jing & Li Xiuting & Mou Xindi & Dong Zhi, 2020. "The Effect of Industrial Structure Change on Carbon Dioxide Emissions: A Cross-Country Panel Analysis," Journal of Systems Science and Information, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-16, February.
    3. Kowalewski, Julia, 2012. "Inter-industrial relations and sectoral employment development in German regions," HWWI Research Papers 127, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    4. Adom, Philip Kofi & Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin, 2016. "What drives the energy saving role of FDI and industrialization in East Africa?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 925-942.
    5. Xu, Haoxin & Romagnoli, Alessandro & Sze, Jia Yin & Py, Xavier, 2017. "Application of material assessment methodology in latent heat thermal energy storage for waste heat recovery," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 187(C), pages 281-290.
    6. Ishmael Ackah, 2016. "Policy interventions in renewable energy for sustainable development: is Ghana on the right path to achieve SDG 7?," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 16/013, African Governance and Development Institute..
    7. Cenjie Liu & Chunbo Ma & Rui Xie, 2020. "Structural, Innovation and Efficiency Effects of Environmental Regulation: Evidence from China’s Carbon Emissions Trading Pilot," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 75(4), pages 741-768, April.
    8. Papastylianou, Panayiota T. & Argyrokastritis, Ioannis G., 2014. "Effect of limited drip irrigation regime on yield, yield components, and fiber quality of cotton under Mediterranean conditions," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 127-134.
    9. Abid, Mehdi, 2016. "Impact of economic, financial, and institutional factors on CO2 emissions: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa economies," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 85-94.
    10. Marta Gotz, 2015. "Tendencje rozwojowe klastrów w Niemczech / Development Tendencies of German Clusters," International Economics, University of Lodz, Faculty of Economics and Sociology, issue 11, pages 106-144, September.
    11. Lingyun He & Fang Yin & Zhangqi Zhong & Zhihua Ding, 2017. "The impact of local government investment on the carbon emissions reduction effect: An empirical analysis of panel data from 30 provinces and municipalities in China," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 12(7), pages 1-20, July.
    12. Liu, Li-Jing & Liang, Qiao-Mei & Creutzig, Felix & Ward, Hauke & Zhang, Kun, 2020. "Sweet spots are in the food system: Structural adjustments to co-control regional pollutants and national GHG emissions in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 171(C).
    13. Furuoka, Fumitaka, 2015. "The CO2 emissions–development nexus revisited," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 1256-1275.
    14. Adom, Philip K. & Kwakwa, Paul Adjei, 2014. "Effects of changing trade structure and technical characteristics of the manufacturing sector on energy intensity in Ghana," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 475-483.
    15. Lu, Qinli & Yang, Hong & Huang, Xianjin & Chuai, Xiaowei & Wu, Changyan, 2015. "Multi-sectoral decomposition in decoupling industrial growth from carbon emissions in the developed Jiangsu Province, China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 414-425.
    16. Lin, Boqiang & Moubarak, Mohamed & Ouyang, Xiaoling, 2014. "Carbon dioxide emissions and growth of the manufacturing sector: Evidence for China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 830-837.
    17. Wang, Chunhua, 2013. "Differential output growth across regions and carbon dioxide emissions: Evidence from U.S. and China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 230-236.
    18. Fu, Shuai & Sun, Lin & Luo, Yi, 2016. "Combining sap flow measurements and modelling to assess water needs in an oasis farmland shelterbelt of Populus simonii Carr in Northwest China," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 177(C), pages 172-180.
    19. Francisco Benita & Serhad Sarica & Garvit Bansal, 2020. "Testing the static and dynamic performance of statistical methods for the detection of national industrial clusters," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 99(4), pages 1137-1157, August.
    20. Bennouna, Amin & El Hebil, Charaf, 2016. "Energy needs for Morocco 2030, as obtained from GDP-energy and GDP-energy intensity correlations," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 45-55.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    industrial transformation; water use efficiency; (input-output) I-O analysis; sustainable development; water resources management;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:7:y:2014:i:1:p:56-74:d:43865. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team). General contact details of provider: https://www.mdpi.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.