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Government Governance, Legal Environment and Sustainable Economic Development

Author

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  • Feng Wei

    () (School of Economics and Business Administration, Chongqing University, No. 174 Shazhengjie, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400030, China)

  • Yu Kong

    () (College of Economics, Guizhou University, Huaxi District, Guizhou Province, 550025 Guiyang, China)

Abstract

Based on China’s inter-provincial panel data from 1999–2009, this paper has tested the impact and extent of marketization, government governance, and legal environment of sustainable economic development by controlling physical capital, human capital and productivity, so as to find the institutional reality for the difference in China’s economic development and another explanation for it. It turns out that marketization, government governance, and legal environment play significant roles in promoting sustainable economic development. Further tests show that the results of Eastern China are consistent with China’s inter-provincial results; while in Western China, the promotion effect of marketization, government governance, and legal environment on sustainable economic development is not significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Feng Wei & Yu Kong, 2014. "Government Governance, Legal Environment and Sustainable Economic Development," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(4), pages 1-16, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:6:y:2014:i:4:p:2248-2263:d:35144
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Vladislav Valentinov & Gabriela Vaceková, 2015. "Sustainability of Rural Nonprofit Organizations: Czech Republic and Beyond," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(8), pages 1-17, July.
    2. Li, Renyu & Ma, Zhongxin & Chen, Xirong, 2020. "Historical market genes, marketization and economic growth in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 327-333.
    3. Andrea Baudoin Farah & Almudena Gómez-Ramos, 2014. "Competitiveness vs. Sustainability: An Assessment of Profitability as a Component of an Approach on “Sustainable Competitiveness” in Extensive Farming Systems of Central Spain," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(11), pages 1-27, November.
    4. Baocheng He & Jiawei Wang & Jiaoyang Wang & Kun Wang, 2018. "The Impact of Government Competition on Regional R&D Efficiency: Does Legal Environment Matter in China’s Innovation System?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(12), pages 1-18, November.

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