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Prospects and Challenges for Disseminating Life Cycle Thinking towards Environmental Conscious Behaviors in Daily Lives

Author

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  • Kazutoshi Tsuda

    () (School/Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan)

  • Keishiro Hara

    () (Center for Environmental Innovation Design for Sustainability (CEIDS), Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan)

  • Michinori Uwasu

    () (Center for Environmental Innovation Design for Sustainability (CEIDS), Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan)

Abstract

We examined the existing practices of various media to ascertain the usability of information based on life cycle thinking (LCT) which can be key to changing consciousness and behavior of consumers towards pursuing a sustainable society . Such information has been provided to consumers in various forms in various places at various times. Nevertheless, a number of issues, such as understandability , selectability, reliability, transparency, and costs etc ., must still be addressed before consumers will be able to use such information as guidelines for pro-environmental behaviors in their everyday life. Further, it is also of critical importance that the consumers can culture LCT by encouraging themselves to be actively engaged in the design and evaluation processes of the upstream of productions and in the entire product life cycle. Another crucial challenge is finding ways to connect LCT with, not just product selection or designing and manufacturing, but lifestyle transformation. We need to encourage ourselves and others to think about what a sustainable life really means.

Suggested Citation

  • Kazutoshi Tsuda & Keishiro Hara & Michinori Uwasu, 2013. "Prospects and Challenges for Disseminating Life Cycle Thinking towards Environmental Conscious Behaviors in Daily Lives," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(1), pages 1-13, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:5:y:2013:i:1:p:123-135:d:22640
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Faruqui, Ahmad & Sergici, Sanem & Sharif, Ahmed, 2010. "The impact of informational feedback on energy consumption—A survey of the experimental evidence," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 1598-1608.
    2. Webster, Frederick E, Jr, 1975. " Determining the Characteristics of the Socially Conscious Consumer," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(3), pages 188-196, December.
    3. Isamu Matsukawa, 2004. "The Effects of Information on Residential Demand for Electricity," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-18.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Elena Tamburini & Paola Pedrini & Maria Gabriella Marchetti & Elisa Anna Fano & Giuseppe Castaldelli, 2015. "Life Cycle Based Evaluation of Environmental and Economic Impacts of Agricultural Productions in the Mediterranean Area," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(3), pages 1-21, March.
    2. Godfred Seidu Jasaw & Osamu Saito & Kazuhiko Takeuchi, 2015. "Shea ( Vitellaria paradoxa ) Butter Production and Resource Use by Urban and Rural Processors in Northern Ghana," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(4), pages 1-23, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    life cycle thinking ; environmental conscious behavior; consumer; visualization; personal fabrication;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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