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Sustainable Social and Individual Implications of Telework: A New Insight into the Romanian Labor Market

Author

Listed:
  • Alina-Mihaela Dima

    () (UNESCO Chair for Business Administration, Bucharest University of Economic Studies, 010731 Bucharest, Romania)

  • Claudia-Elena Țuclea

    () (Department of Tourism and Geography, Bucharest University of Economic Studies, 010404 Bucharest, Romania)

  • Diana-Maria Vrânceanu

    () (Department of Marketing, Bucharest University of Economic Studies, 010404 Bucharest, Romania)

  • Gabriela Țigu

    () (Department of Tourism and Geography, Bucharest University of Economic Studies, 010404 Bucharest, Romania)

Abstract

This research aims to evaluate the individual and social implications of telework, along with the foreseeable permanent result that could be generated. Consistent with this objective, a survey has been carried out on a sample of 1180 Romanian employees, on which a model has been developed, based on structural equation modelling. The model includes five latent variables, on the one hand targeting telework features and on the other hand, its possible effects on individuals and society. At an individual level, the study results emphasize that telework could contribute to a better work–life balance and could also help teleworkers to develop specific teleworking abilities. At a social level, telework could generate sustainable effects targeting the long-term management of the work force and providing solutions to potential problems at local community levels. The managerial implications of this study are directed toward the need to implement a series of sustainable human resource management strategies and efficient employee training and development programs. Moreover, organizations need to be more proactive in assuming corporate social responsibilities.

Suggested Citation

  • Alina-Mihaela Dima & Claudia-Elena Țuclea & Diana-Maria Vrânceanu & Gabriela Țigu, 2019. "Sustainable Social and Individual Implications of Telework: A New Insight into the Romanian Labor Market," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(13), pages 1-12, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:13:p:3506-:d:243093
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Greta Onken-Menke & Stephan Nüesch & Claudia Kröll, 2018. "Are you attracted? Do you remain? Meta-analytic evidence on flexible work practices," Business Research, Springer;German Academic Association for Business Research, vol. 11(2), pages 239-277, September.
    2. Sarbu, Miruna, 2018. "The role of telecommuting for work-family conflict among German employees," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 37-51.
    3. Yu, Xiaoyu & Meng, Xiaotong & Chen, Yi & Chen, Yingying & Nguyen, Bang, 2018. "Work-family conflict, organizational ambidexterity and new venture legitimacy in emerging economies," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 229-240.
    4. George-Laurentiu Serban-Oprescu & Silvia Dedu & Anca-Teodora Serban-Oprescu, 2019. "An Integrative Approach to Assess Subjective Well-Being. A Case Study on Romanian University Students," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(6), pages 1-27, March.
    5. Hynes, Mike, 2016. "Developing (tele)work? A multi-level sociotechnical perspective of telework in Ireland," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 21-31.
    6. Michael Hynes, 2014. "Telework Isn’t Working: A Policy Review," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(4), pages 579-602.
    7. Daniela Livia Trașcă & George Marian Ștefan & Daniela Nicoleta Sahlian & Răzvan Hoinaru & George-Laurențiu Șerban-Oprescu, 2019. "Digitalization and Business Activity. The Struggle to Catch Up in CEE Countries," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(8), pages 1-17, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adriana AnaMaria Davidescu & Simona-Andreea Apostu & Andreea Paul & Ionut Casuneanu, 2020. "Work Flexibility, Job Satisfaction, and Job Performance among Romanian Employees—Implications for Sustainable Human Resource Management," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(15), pages 1-53, July.
    2. Ana Gálvez & Francisco Tirado & M. Jesús Martínez, 2020. "Work–Life Balance, Organizations and Social Sustainability: Analyzing Female Telework in Spain," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(9), pages 1-21, April.
    3. Agata Mihaela Popescu, 2019. "Tele-Working in European Legislation and the Romanian Law System," Working papers 021AP, Research Association for Interdisciplinary Studies.
    4. Angel Belzunegui-Eraso & Amaya Erro-Garcés, 2020. "Teleworking in the Context of the Covid-19 Crisis," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(9), pages 1-18, May.
    5. Ivana Katić & Tatjana Knežević & Nemanja Berber & Andrea Ivanišević & Marjan Leber, 2019. "The Impact of Stress on Life, Working, and Management Styles: How to Make an Organization Healthier?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(15), pages 1-17, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    telework; work–life balance; autonomy; teleworkers’ abilities; social implications of telework;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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