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Estimating Residential Electricity Consumption in Nigeria to Support Energy Transitions

Author

Listed:
  • Kayode Olaniyan

    () (Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan)

  • Benjamin C. McLellan

    () (Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan)

  • Seiichi Ogata

    () (Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan)

  • Tetsuo Tezuka

    () (Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan)

Abstract

Considering the challenge of accessing reliable household metering data in Nigeria, how can electricity consumption levels be determined? And how do disparities in electricity consumption patterns across the country affect the pursuit of sustainability, universal access and energy transition objectives? This study combined household-reported data on ownership of electrical appliances and energy expenditure with online sales records of household appliances to estimate current and future residential electricity demand in Nigeria, as well as the required generation capacity to achieve 100% electricity access, under various scenarios. Median residential electricity consumption was estimated at 18–27 kWh per capita but these estimates vary between the geographical zones with the North East and South West representing extremes. Under a universal access scenario, the future electricity supply system would be expected to have installed generation capacity sufficient to meet the estimated residential demand of 85 TWh. To further understand the required infrastructure investment as a whole and the approaches that might be preferred in rural versus urban areas, the disaggregated, zone-by-zone and urban/rural data may offer more insight than a whole-of-country approach. The data obtained is useful for identifying specific transitions at the sub-national level that can minimize the required investment while maximizing households’ energy access.

Suggested Citation

  • Kayode Olaniyan & Benjamin C. McLellan & Seiichi Ogata & Tetsuo Tezuka, 2018. "Estimating Residential Electricity Consumption in Nigeria to Support Energy Transitions," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(5), pages 1-1, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:5:p:1440-:d:144752
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jamiu Omotayo Oladigbolu & Makbul A. M. Ramli & Yusuf A. Al-Turki, 2019. "Techno-Economic and Sensitivity Analyses for an Optimal Hybrid Power System Which Is Adaptable and Effective for Rural Electrification: A Case Study of Nigeria," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(18), pages 1-1, September.
    2. Ojo, Ademola Eyitope, 2020. "Determinants of Market Power in Electric Power Market of Rural Areas in Nigeria," Asian Development Policy Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 8(3), pages 156-170, September.
    3. Ugwoke, B. & Gershon, O. & Becchio, C. & Corgnati, S.P. & Leone, P., 2020. "A review of Nigerian energy access studies: The story told so far," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).
    4. Lim, Kai Zhuo & Lim, Kang Hui & Wee, Xian Bin & Li, Yinan & Wang, Xiaonan, 2020. "Optimal allocation of energy storage and solar photovoltaic systems with residential demand scheduling," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 269(C).
    5. Riva, Fabio & Gardumi, Francesco & Tognollo, Annalisa & Colombo, Emanuela, 2019. "Soft-linking energy demand and optimisation models for local long-term electricity planning: An application to rural India," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 32-46.
    6. Andrea Cabanero & Lars Nolting & Aaron Praktiknjo, 2020. "Mini-Grids for the Sustainable Electrification of Rural Areas in Sub-Saharan Africa: Assessing the Potential of KeyMaker Models," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(23), pages 1-1, December.
    7. Aliyu Salisu Barau & Aliyu Haidar Abubakar & Abdul-Hakim Ibrahim Kiyawa, 2020. "Not There Yet: Mapping Inhibitions to Solar Energy Utilisation by Households in African Informal Urban Neighbourhoods," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-1, January.
    8. Aynur Kazaz & Seyda Adiguzel Istil, 2019. "A Comparative Analysis of Sunshine Duration Effects in terms of Renewable Energy Production Rates on The LEED BD + C Projects in Turkey," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(6), pages 1-1, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    electricity access; energy transition; sustainability; household survey; Nigeria;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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