IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jeners/v12y2019i3p448-d202328.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Environmental and Operational Performance of CO 2 -EOR as a CCUS Technology: A Cranfield Example with Dynamic LCA Considerations

Author

Listed:
  • Vanessa Núñez-López

    () (Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, 10100 Burnet Rd., Austin, TX 78758, USA)

  • Ramón Gil-Egui

    () (Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, 10100 Burnet Rd., Austin, TX 78758, USA)

  • Seyyed A. Hosseini

    () (Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, 10100 Burnet Rd., Austin, TX 78758, USA)

Abstract

This study evaluates the potential of carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery (CO 2 -EOR) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without compromising oil production goals. A novel, dynamic carbon lifecycle analysis (d-LCA) was developed and used to understand the evolution of the environmental impact (CO 2 emissions) and mitigation (geologic CO 2 storage) associated with an expanded carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) system, from start to closure of operations. EOR operational performance was assessed through CO 2 utilization rates, which relate usage of CO 2 to oil production. Because field operational strategies have a significant impact on reservoir engineering parameters that affect both CO 2 storage and oil production (e.g., sweep efficiency, flood conformance, fluid saturation distribution), we conducted a scenario analysis that assessed the operational and environmental performance of four common and novel CO 2 -EOR field development strategies. Each scenario was evaluated with and without stacked saline carbon storage, an EOR/storage combination strategy where excess CO 2 from the recycling facility is injected into an underlying saline aquifer for long-term carbon storage. The dynamic interplay between operational and environmental performance formed the basis of our CCUS technology analysis. The results showed that all CO 2 -EOR evaluated scenarios start operating with a negative carbon footprint and, years into the project, transitioned into operating with a positive carbon footprint. The transition points were significantly different in each scenario. Water-alternating-gas (WAG) was identified as the CO 2 injection strategy with the highest potential to co-optimize EOR and carbon storage goals. The results provide an understanding of the evolution of the system’s net carbon balance in all four field development strategies studied. The environmental performance can be significantly improved with stacked storage, where a negative carbon footprint can be maintained throughout the life of the operation in most of the injection scenarios modelled. This information will be useful to CO 2 -EOR operators seeking value in storing more CO 2 through a carbon credit program (e.g., the 45Q carbon credit program in the USA). Most importantly, this study serves as confirmation that CO 2 -EOR can be operationally designed to both enhance oil production and reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere.

Suggested Citation

  • Vanessa Núñez-López & Ramón Gil-Egui & Seyyed A. Hosseini, 2019. "Environmental and Operational Performance of CO 2 -EOR as a CCUS Technology: A Cranfield Example with Dynamic LCA Considerations," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-15, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jeners:v:12:y:2019:i:3:p:448-:d:202328
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/1996-1073/12/3/448/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/1996-1073/12/3/448/
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Leach, Andrew & Mason, Charles F. & Veld, Klaas van ‘t, 2011. "Co-optimization of enhanced oil recovery and carbon sequestration," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 893-912.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CO 2 -EOR; geologic carbon sequestration; CCUS; co-optimization; carbon balance; LCA;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • Q49 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Other

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jeners:v:12:y:2019:i:3:p:448-:d:202328. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team). General contact details of provider: https://www.mdpi.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.