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U.S. jobs gained and lost through trade: a net measure

Author

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  • Erica L. Groshen
  • Bart Hobijn
  • Margaret M. McConnell

Abstract

Recent concerns about the transfer of U.S. services jobs to overseas workers have deepened long-standing fears about the effects of trade on the domestic labor market. But a balanced view of the impact of trade requires that we consider jobs created through the production of U.S. exports as well as jobs lost to imports. A new measure of the jobs gained and lost in international trade flows suggests that the net number of U.S. jobs lost is relatively small-2.4 percent of total U.S. employment as of 2003.

Suggested Citation

  • Erica L. Groshen & Bart Hobijn & Margaret M. McConnell, 2005. "U.S. jobs gained and lost through trade: a net measure," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 11(Aug).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednci:y:2005:i:aug:n:v.11no.8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard B. Freeman, 2006. "Does Globalization of the Scientific/Engineering Workforce Threaten U.S. Economic Leadership?," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 6, pages 123-158 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maren Lurweg & Andreas Westermeier, "undated". "Jobs Gained and Lost through Trade - The Case of Germany," Working Papers 200114, Institute of Spatial and Housing Economics, Munster Universitary.
    2. Gregory Mankiw, N. & Swagel, Phillip, 2006. "The politics and economics of offshore outsourcing," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(5), pages 1027-1056, July.
    3. Brown, Clair & Linden, Greg, 2007. "Semiconductor Engineers in a Global Economy," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt6fr9b2p9, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    4. Maren Lurweg & Jens Oelgemöller & Andreas Westermeier, "undated". "Sectoral Job Effects of Trade - An Input-Output Analysis for Germany," Working Papers 200113, Institute of Spatial and Housing Economics, Munster Universitary.
    5. Ekholm, Karolina & Ulltveit-Moe, Karen-Helene, 2007. "A New Look at Offshoring and Inequality: Specialization Versus Competition," CEPR Discussion Papers 6402, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Lurweg, Maren & Westermeier, Andreas, 2010. "Jobs gained and lost through trade: The case of Germany," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 95, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    7. Lurweg, Maren & Oelgemöller, Jens & Westermeier, Andreas, 2010. "Sectoral job effects of trade: An input-output analysis for Germany," CAWM Discussion Papers 19, University of Münster, Center of Applied Economic Research Münster (CAWM).
    8. Lurweg, Maren & Westermeier, Andreas, 2010. "Jobs gained and lost through trade: The case of Germany," CAWM Discussion Papers 18, University of Münster, Center of Applied Economic Research Münster (CAWM).
    9. repec:eee:eecrev:v:98:y:2017:i:c:p:217-239 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor market ; Exports ; International trade;

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