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Sovereign debt: a modern Greek tragedy

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  • Martin, Fernando M.
  • Waller, Christopher J.

Abstract

The authors of this article provide a general introduction to the concept of sovereign debt—including the seductive nature of borrowing and the strategies associated with default—before analyzing the current debt crises in Europe. They focus on Greece’s current woes but also discuss Portugal, Ireland, Italy, and Spain. The authors also discuss the environment in the United States, which has a high debt burden of its own, and present fiscal choices for policymakers and taxpayers.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin, Fernando M. & Waller, Christopher J., 2012. "Sovereign debt: a modern Greek tragedy," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 321-340.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrv:y:2012:i:september:p:321-340:n:v.94no.5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2014. "This Time is Different: A Panoramic View of Eight Centuries of Financial Crises," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(2), pages 1065-1188, November.
    2. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
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    Cited by:

    1. Silvio Contessi, 2012. "An application of conventional sovereign debt sustainability analysis to the current debt crises," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 197-220.
    2. Aurore Burietz & Loredana Ureche - Rangau, 2016. "A modern Dionysus' tale: new evidence on the Greek debt crisis and the related costs," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(4), pages 1938-1950.
    3. Andrea Terzi, 2014. "When Good Intentions Pave the Road to Hell: Monetization Fears and Europe's Narrowing Options," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_810, Levy Economics Institute.
    4. Sibbertsen, Philipp & Wegener, Christoph & Basse, Tobias, 2014. "Testing for a break in the persistence in yield spreads of EMU government bonds," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 109-118.

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    Keywords

    Debt; Greece;

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