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Sovereign debt: a modern Greek tragedy

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  • Fernando M. Martin
  • Christopher J. Waller

Abstract

The authors of this article provide a general introduction to the concept of sovereign debt?including the seductive nature of borrowing and the strategies associated with default?before analyzing the current debt crises in Europe. They focus on Greece?s current woes but also discuss Portugal, Ireland, Italy, and Spain. The authors also discuss the environment in the United States, which has a high debt burden of its own, and present fiscal choices for policymakers and taxpayers.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando M. Martin & Christopher J. Waller, 2012. "Sovereign debt: a modern Greek tragedy," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 321-340.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrv:y:2012:i:september:p:321-340:n:v.94no.5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2014. "This Time is Different: A Panoramic View of Eight Centuries of Financial Crises," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(2), pages 215-268, November.
    2. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters, in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly, Princeton University Press.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fernando M. Martin, 2016. "The Value of Constraints on Discretionary Government Policy," Working Papers 2016-19, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    2. Mohammed Aliu Momoh & Maurice Aghedo, 2018. "Public Private Partnership, Infrastructure Guarantee and Sovereign Debt Default," Romanian Economic Business Review, Romanian-American University, vol. 13(1), pages 25-34, March.
    3. Aurore Burietz & Loredana Ureche - Rangau, 2016. "A modern Dionysus' tale: new evidence on the Greek debt crisis and the related costs," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(4), pages 1938-1950.
    4. Susanna Saroyan & Lilit Popoyan, 2017. "Bank-sovereign ties against interbank market integration: the case of the Italian segment," LEM Papers Series 2017/02, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    5. Fernando Martin, 2019. "How to Starve the Beast: Fiscal and Monetary Policy Rules," 2019 Meeting Papers 1181, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Andrea Terzi, 2014. "When Good Intentions Pave the Road to Hell: Monetization Fears and Europe's Narrowing Options," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_810, Levy Economics Institute.
    7. Sibbertsen, Philipp & Wegener, Christoph & Basse, Tobias, 2014. "Testing for a break in the persistence in yield spreads of EMU government bonds," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 109-118.
    8. Mulatu Fekadu Zerihun & Marthinus C. Breitenbach, 2017. "Panel Data Analysis of the Proposed Monetary Union in the Southern African Development Community," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, vol. 67(4), pages 23-44, October-D.
    9. Silvio Contessi, 2012. "An application of conventional sovereign debt sustainability analysis to the current debt crises," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 94(May), pages 197-220.
    10. Jareño, Francisco & González, María de la O & Escolástico, Alba M., 2020. "Extension of the Fama and French model: A study of the largest European financial institutions," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 115-139.

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    Keywords

    Greece; Debt;

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