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Opportunity knocks: improved matching of jobs and workers

Author

Listed:
  • Didem Tuzemen
  • Jonathan L. Willis

Abstract

Tzemen and Willis illustrate that over the past year, workers found jobs more closely matched to their educational attainment.

Suggested Citation

  • Didem Tuzemen & Jonathan L. Willis, 2015. "Opportunity knocks: improved matching of jobs and workers," Macro Bulletin, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 1-3, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkmb:00022
    as

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    File URL: https://www.kansascityfed.org/~/media/files/publicat/research/macrobulletins/mb15tuzemenwillis_f.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Didem Tuzemen & Jonathan L. Willis, 2013. "The vanishing middle: job polarization and workers’ response to the decline in middle-skill jobs," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 98(Q I), pages 5-32.
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