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Cobb-Douglas Production Function: The Case of a Converging Economy

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Abstract

The Cobb-Douglas production function is often used to analyse the supply-side performance and measurement of a country’s productive potential. This functional form, however, includes the assumption of a constant share of labor in output, which may be too restrictive for a converging country. For example, labor share in the Czech Republic gradually increased over the last decade. In this paper, we test whether this fact renders the application of the Cobb-Douglas production function unreliable for the Czech economy. The authors apply a more general form of production function and allow labor share to develop according to the empirical data. For the period 1995–2005, the authors do not find significant difference between the calculation of the supply side of the Czech economy by the Cobb-Douglas production function and a more general production function.

Suggested Citation

  • Dana Hájková & Jaromír Hurník, 2007. "Cobb-Douglas Production Function: The Case of a Converging Economy," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 57(9-10), pages 465-476, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:fauart:v:57:y:2007:i:9-10:p:465-476
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    Cited by:

    1. Rybak, Aurelia & Rybak, Aleksandra, 2016. "Possible strategies for hard coal mining in Poland as a result of production function analysis," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 27-33.
    2. Paul E. Brockway & Harry Saunders & Matthew K. Heun & Timothy J. Foxon & Julia K. Steinberger & John R. Barrett & Steve Sorrell, 2017. "Energy Rebound as a Potential Threat to a Low-Carbon Future: Findings from a New Exergy-Based National-Level Rebound Approach," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(1), pages 1-24, January.
    3. Hanousek, Jan & Kočenda, Evžen & Mašika, Michal, 2012. "Firm efficiency: Domestic owners, coalitions, and FDI," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 471-486.
    4. Paul E. Brockway & Matthew K. Heun & João Santos & John R. Barrett, 2017. "Energy-Extended CES Aggregate Production: Current Aspects of Their Specification and Econometric Estimation," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-23, February.
    5. Ana-Maria Sandica & Alexie Alupoaiei, 2013. "The Implications for Fiscal Policy Considering Rule-of-Thumb Consumers in the New Keynesian Model for Romania," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 3(3), pages 365-371, July.
    6. Matthew K. Heun & João Santos & Paul E. Brockway & Randall Pruim & Tiago Domingos & Marco Sakai, 2017. "From Theory to Econometrics to Energy Policy: Cautionary Tales for Policymaking Using Aggregate Production Functions," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-44, February.
    7. Tomáš Buus, 2012. "Daně z příjmů versus daň z přidaní hodnoty v malé otevřené ekonomice
      [Taxes on income vs. value added tax in small open economy]
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2012(1), pages 58-80.
    8. Natan P. Epstein & Corrado Macchiarelli, 2010. "Estimating Poland's Potential Output; A Production Function Approach," IMF Working Papers 10/15, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Jaromír Hurník & Dana Hájková, 2007. "Supply-Side Performance in the Czech Republic: A Macroeconomic View (1995-2005)," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2007(4), pages 319-335.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    potential output; production function; labor share; total factor productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production

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