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Exploring Trends in the Rate of Caesarean Section in Ireland 1999-2007

Author

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  • AOIFE BRICK

    (The Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

  • RICHARD LAYTE

    (The Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

Abstract

: This paper explores levels and trends in the prevalence of Caesarean section delivery in Ireland between 1999 and 2007. Over this period the Caesarean section rate for singleton births in Ireland increased by over one quarter. Using data from the Irish National Perinatal Reporting System and the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry scheme we examine the contribution of maternal, delivery and clinical characteristics to the rise in the Caesarean section rate over the period. Analyses show small increases in the clinical indicators of risk for Caesarean section driven by significant change in maternal characteristics (age of mothers and number of previous deliveries) and possible changes in obstetric practice. Grouped logit models of risk of Caesarean by hospital and time period account for 55 per cent of the variation in the growth trend across hospitals. We discuss the possible contribution of changes in obstetric practice

Suggested Citation

  • Aoife Brick & Richard Layte, 2011. "Exploring Trends in the Rate of Caesarean Section in Ireland 1999-2007," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 42(4), pages 383-406.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:42:y:2011:i:4:p:383-406
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    File URL: http://www.esr.ie/vol42_4/01%20Brick%20Article_ESRI%20Vol%2042-4.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Henry, O.A. & Gregory, K.D. & Hobel, C.J. & Platt, L.D., 1995. "Using ICD-9 codes to identify indications for primary and repeat cesarean sections: Agreement with clinical records," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 85(8), pages 1143-1146.
    2. Jonathan Gruber & Maria Owings, 1996. "Physician Financial Incentives and Cesarean Section Delivery," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 27(1), pages 99-123, Spring.
    3. Moulton, Brent R., 1986. "Random group effects and the precision of regression estimates," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 385-397, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mark E. McGovern, 2016. "Progress and the Lack of Progress in Addressing Infant Health and Infant Health Inequalities in Ireland during the 20th Century," Economics Working Papers 16-05, Queen's Management School, Queen's University Belfast.
    2. Patricia Kennedy, 2012. "Change in Maternity Provision in Ireland,“Elephants on the Move”," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(3), pages 377-395.
    3. Paddy Gillespie & Sharon Walsh & John Cullinan & Declan Devane, 2019. "An Analysis of Antenatal Care Pathways to Mode of Birth in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 50(2), pages 391-427.
    4. Wen-Yi Chen, 2013. "Do caesarean section rates ‘catch-up’? Evidence from 14 European countries," Health Care Management Science, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 328-340, December.
    5. Sunita Panda & Cecily Begley & Deirdre Daly, 2018. "Clinicians’ views of factors influencing decision-making for caesarean section: A systematic review and metasynthesis of qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods studies," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(7), pages 1-27, July.

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