IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eme/ijdipp/v10y2011i3p188-203.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The evolution of the state and taxation: role of agriculture

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Grabowski

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyze those conditions which determine whether the state will be developmental or predatory. Design/methodology/approach - A theoretical model is developed to analyze those factors influencing state policy towards agriculture. Then the historical experiences of China, Japan, and Sub-Saharan Africa are used to illustrate the workings of the model. Findings - A necessary condition for growth promoting (poverty reducing) policy reforms, with respect to agriculture, is that a technological backlog must exist in agriculture. Practical implications - International organizations can play an important role in helping to create the necessary condition for effective reform. Significant investment in regional agricultural research institutions must be made so as to create a technological backlog in agriculture. Social implications - Investment in agricultural research has been declining. Thus, the availability of new technology has lessened. This poses an obstacle to rapid growth and poverty reduction. This paper seeks to refocus the attention of policy makers on agriculture. Originality/value - This paper develops a theory to explain how and when states in developing countries are likely to become developmental. The ideas are illustrated by the experiences of parts of Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. These results will be useful to domestic policy makers in developing countries as well as the policy makers in international organizations.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Grabowski, 2011. "The evolution of the state and taxation: role of agriculture," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 10(3), pages 188-203, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:ijdipp:v:10:y:2011:i:3:p:188-203
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/14468951111165331?utm_campaign=RePEc&WT.mc_id=RePEc
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Göran Therborn & K.C. Ho, 2009. "Introduction," City, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 53-62, March.
    2. Shenggen Fan & Connie Chan-Kang & Keming Qian & K. Krishnaiah, 2005. "National and international agricultural research and rural poverty: the case of rice research in India and China," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 33(s3), pages 369-379, November.
    3. Alejandro Nin-Pratt & Bingxin Yu & Shenggen Fan, 2010. "Comparisons of agricultural productivity growth in China and India," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 209-223, June.
    4. Nin Pratt, Alejandro & Yu, Bingxin, 2008. "An updated look at the recovery of agricultural productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 787, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Bezemer, Dirk & Headey, Derek, 2008. "Agriculture, Development, and Urban Bias," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 1342-1364, August.
    6. Gordon, Roger & Li, Wei, 2009. "Tax structures in developing countries: Many puzzles and a possible explanation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(7-8), pages 855-866, August.
    7. Kelley, Allen C. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1971. "Writing History Backwards: Meiji Japan Revisited," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(04), pages 729-776, December.
    8. Daniel K.N. Johnson & Robert E. Evenson, 2000. "How Far Away Is Africa? Technological Spillovers to Agriculture and Productivity," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(3), pages 743-749.
    9. Bruton, H.J., 1998. "A Reconsideration of Import Substitution," Center for Development Economics 156, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    10. Henry J. Bruton, 1998. "A Reconsideration of Import Substitution," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 903-936, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eme:ijdipp:v:10:y:2011:i:3:p:188-203. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Virginia Chapman). General contact details of provider: http://www.emeraldinsight.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.