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Variations in Maternal and Child Well-Being among Financially Eligible Mothers by TANF Participation Status

Author

Listed:
  • Nancy E. Reichman

    () (Department of Pediatrics, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey)

  • Julien O. Teitler

    (School of Social Work, Columbia University)

  • Irwin Garfinkel

    (School of Social Work, Columbia University)

  • Sandra Garcia

    (School of Social Work, Columbia University)

Abstract

We use baseline and one year follow-up data from the national Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to compare levels of hardship across the following groups of TANF-eligible mothers: those receiving TANF at the time of the follow-up interview; those who had received TANF during the year but left the rolls possibly because they were sanctioned or hit term limits; those who had received TANF during the year but left the rolls, were not sanctioned, and could not have hit term limits; and those who had not participated at all. We find that 45% of eligible mothers do not participate in TANF, that all groups of eligible mothers have high levels of hardship, and that TANF leavers who were sanctioned or may have hit term limits are markedly worse off at one year than any other group in terms of both extreme material hardship and poor mental health.

Suggested Citation

  • Nancy E. Reichman & Julien O. Teitler & Irwin Garfinkel & Sandra Garcia, 2004. "Variations in Maternal and Child Well-Being among Financially Eligible Mothers by TANF Participation Status," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 101-118, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:30:y:2004:i:1:p:101-118
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    File URL: http://web.holycross.edu/RePEc/eej/Archive/Volume30/V30N1P101_118.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jeffrey Grogger & Charles Michalopoulos, 2003. "Welfare Dynamics under Time Limits," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(3), pages 530-554, June.
    2. J. P. Ziliak & D. N. Figlio & E. E. Davis & L. S. Connolly, "undated". "Accounting for the Decline in AFDC Caseloads: Welfare Reform or Economic Growth?," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1151-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    3. Schoeni, R.F. & Blank, R.M., 2000. "What Has Welfare Reform Accomplished? Impacts on Welfare Participation, Employment, Income, Poverty, and Family Structure," Papers 00-02, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
    4. Rebecca M. Blank, 2002. "Evaluating Welfare Reform in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1105-1166, December.
    5. Sheldon Danziger & Colleen M. Heflin & Mary Corcoran & Elizabeth Oltmans, 2002. "Does it Pay to Move from Welfare to Work?," JCPR Working Papers 254, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hélène Périvier, 2009. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis. Évolutions mises en perspective avec celles de la France et de la Suède," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(1), pages 49-84.
    2. Roderick Rose & Susan Parish & Joan Yoo, 2009. "Measuring Material Hardship among the US Population of Women with Disabilities Using Latent Class Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 94(3), pages 391-415, December.
    3. Julien O. Teitler & Nancy E. Reichman & Lenna Nepomnyaschy & Irwin Garfinkel, 2006. "Effects of Welfare Participation on Marriage," Working Papers 933, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child; Mothers; Well Being;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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