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Pump-Priming Payments for Sustainable Water Services in Rural Africa

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  • Koehler, Johanna
  • Thomson, Patrick
  • Hope, Robert

Abstract

Locally managed handpumps provide water services to around 200million people in rural Africa. Handpump failures often result in extended service disruption leading to high but avoidable financial, health, and development costs. Using unique observational data from monitoring handpump usage in rural Kenya, we evaluate how dramatic improvements in maintenance services influence payment preferences across institutional, operational, and geographic factors. Public goods theory is applied to examine new institutional forms of handpump management. Results reveal steps to enhance rural water supply sustainability by pooling maintenance and financial risks at scale supported by advances in monitoring and payment technologies.

Suggested Citation

  • Koehler, Johanna & Thomson, Patrick & Hope, Robert, 2015. "Pump-Priming Payments for Sustainable Water Services in Rural Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 397-411.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:74:y:2015:i:c:p:397-411
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.05.020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fiorini, Matteo & Hoekman, Bernard, 2018. "Services trade policy and sustainable development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1-12.
    2. Carlitz, Ruth D., 2017. "Money Flows, Water Trickles: Understanding Patterns of Decentralized Water Provision in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 16-30.

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