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The Determinants of Water Connection and Water Consumption: Empirical Evidence from a Cambodian Household Survey

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  • Basani, Marcello
  • Isham, Jonathan
  • Reilly, Barry

Abstract

Summary Using cross-sectional household-level data from seven provincial towns and one district in Cambodia, we estimate both an access-to-water network equation and a water demand equation. We find that the connection elasticity with respect to the one-off initial connection fee is -0.39 and the price elasticity of water demand for the connected households lies in a range between -0.5 and -0.4. The policy implication of this research is that development practitioners should consider a connection (rather than a consumption) subsidy scheme, as it would stimulate increased access to clean water among all households, including the poorest.

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  • Basani, Marcello & Isham, Jonathan & Reilly, Barry, 2008. "The Determinants of Water Connection and Water Consumption: Empirical Evidence from a Cambodian Household Survey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 953-968, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:36:y:2008:i:5:p:953-968
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    Cited by:

    1. Sidibé, Amadou, 2010. "Demand for soil, water and forest conservation in Burkina Faso," Department of Forest Economics publications 2345, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of forest economics.
    2. Henrique Monteiro, 2010. "Residential Water Demand in Portugal: checking for efficiency-based justifications for increasing block tariffs," Working Papers Series 1 ercwp0110, ISCTE-IUL, Business Research Unit (BRU-IUL).
    3. Céline Nauges & Dale Whittington, 2010. "Estimation of Water Demand in Developing Countries: An Overview," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 25(2), pages 263-294, August.
    4. Onjala, Joseph & Ndiritu, Simon Wagura & Stage, Jesper, 2013. "Risk Perception, Choice of Drinking Water, and Water Treatment: Evidence from Kenyan Towns," Discussion Papers dp-13-10-efd, Resources For the Future.
    5. David R. Bell & Ronald C. Griffin, 2011. "Urban Water Demand with Periodic Error Correction," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(3), pages 528-544.
    6. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova & Tomas Vlach, 2017. "Measuring the Income Elasticity of Water Demand: The Importance of Publication and Endogeneity Biases," Working Papers IES 2017/02, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Feb 2017.
    7. Nunoo, Jacob & Koomson, Isaac & Orkoh, Emmanuel, 2015. "Household Deficiency in Demand for Water: Do Water Source and Travel Time Matter?," MPRA Paper 66007, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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