IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/landec/v94y2018i2p259-283.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Measuring the Income Elasticity of Water Demand: The Importance of Publication and Endogeneity Biases

Author

Listed:
  • Tomas Havranek
  • Zuzana Irsova
  • Tomas Vlach

Abstract

We present the first study that examines the effects of publication selection in the literature estimating the income elasticity of water demand. Paradoxically, more affected by publication selection are the otherwise preferable estimates that control for endogeneity. Attempting to correct simultaneously for publication and endogeneity biases, we find that the mean underlying elasticity is approximately 0.15 or less. The result is robust to controlling for more than 30 characteristics of the estimates and accounting for model uncertainty. The differences in the reported estimates are systematically driven by differences in the tariff structure, regional coverage, data granularity, and control for temperature.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova & Tomas Vlach, 2018. "Measuring the Income Elasticity of Water Demand: The Importance of Publication and Endogeneity Biases," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 94(2), pages 259-283.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:94:y:2018:i:2:p:259-283
    Note: DOI: 10.3368/le.94.2.259
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/94/2/259
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Feldkircher & Stefan Zeugner, 2012. "The impact of data revisions on the robustness of growth determinants—a note on ‘determinants of economic growth: Will data tell?’," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 686-694, June.
    2. Jasper M. Dalhuisen & Raymond J. G. M. Florax & JHenri L. F. de Groot & Peter Nijkamp, 2003. "Price and Income Elasticities of Residential Water Demand: A Meta-Analysis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(2), pages 292-308.
    3. Roseta-Palma, Catarina & Monteiro, Henrique, 2008. "Pricing for Scarcity," MPRA Paper 10384, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. S. Gaudin, 2006. "Effect of price information on residential water demand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 383-393.
    5. R. Bruce Billings, 1982. "Specification of Block Rate Price Variables in Demand Models," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 58(3), pages 386-394.
    6. Steven Andrew Fenrick & Lullit Getachew, 2012. "Estimation of the effects of price and billing frequency on household water demand using a panel of Wisconsin municipalities," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(14), pages 1373-1380, September.
    7. Céline Nauges & Alban Thomas, 2003. "Long-run Study of Residential Water Consumption," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 26(1), pages 25-43, September.
    8. Schleich, Joachim & Hillenbrand, Thomas, 2009. "Determinants of residential water demand in Germany," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(6), pages 1756-1769, April.
    9. Basani, Marcello & Isham, Jonathan & Reilly, Barry, 2008. "The Determinants of Water Connection and Water Consumption: Empirical Evidence from a Cambodian Household Survey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 953-968, May.
    10. Koji Miyawaki & Yasuhiro Omori & Akira Hibiki, 2011. "Panel Data Analysis Of Japanese Residential Water Demand Using A Discrete/Continuous Choice Approach," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 62(3), pages 365-386, September.
    11. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    12. Olmstead, Sheila M., 2009. "Reduced-Form Versus Structural Models of Water Demand Under Nonlinear Prices," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 27, pages 84-94.
    13. Céline Nauges & Caroline Berg, 2009. "Demand for Piped and Non-piped Water Supply Services: Evidence from Southwest Sri Lanka," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 42(4), pages 535-549, April.
    14. Arbues, Fernando & Garcia-Valinas, Maria Angeles & Martinez-Espineira, Roberto, 2003. "Estimation of residential water demand: a state-of-the-art review," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 81-102, March.
    15. Alexandros Polycarpou & Theodoros Zachariadis, 2013. "An Econometric Analysis of Residential Water Demand in Cyprus," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 27(1), pages 309-317, January.
    16. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Janda, Karel & Zilberman, David, 2015. "Selective reporting and the social cost of carbon," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 394-406.
    17. Havranek, Tomas & Kokes, Ondrej, 2015. "Income elasticity of gasoline demand: A meta-analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 77-86.
    18. Arbues, Fernando & Villanu´a, Inmaculada & Barberán Ortí, Ramón, 2010. "Household size and residential water demand: an empirical approach," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 54(1), pages 1-20.
    19. T. D. Stanley, 2005. "Beyond Publication Bias," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 309-345, July.
    20. Oscar Zapata, 2015. "More Water Please, It's Getting Hot! The Effect of Climate on Residential Water Demand," Water Economics and Policy (WEP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 1(03), pages 1-23.
    21. Theo S. Eicher & Chris Papageorgiou & Adrian E. Raftery, 2011. "Default priors and predictive performance in Bayesian model averaging, with application to growth determinants," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(1), pages 30-55, January/F.
    22. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova, 2017. "Do Borders Really Slash Trade? A Meta-Analysis," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 65(2), pages 365-396, June.
    23. Michael L. Nieswiadomy & David J. Molina, 1991. "A Note on Price Perception in Water Demand Models," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 67(3), pages 352-359.
    24. Strand, Jon & Walker, Ian, 2005. "Water markets and demand in Central American cities," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 313-335, June.
    25. J. E. Schefter & E. L. David, 1985. "Estimating Residential Water Demand under Multi-Part Tariffs Using Aggregate Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 64(3), pages 272-280.
    26. Julie A. Hewitt & W. Michael Hanemann, 1995. "A Discrete/Continuous Choice Approach to Residential Water Demand under Block Rate Pricing," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 71(2), pages 173-192.
    27. MICHAEL Nieswiadomy & STEVEN L. Cobb, 1993. "Impact Of Pricing Structure Selectivity On Urban Water Demand," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 11(3), pages 101-113, July.
    28. Shin, Jeong-Shik, 1985. "Perception of Price When Price Information Is Costly: Evidence from Residential Electricity Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(4), pages 591-598, November.
    29. Seung-Hoon Yoo, 2007. "Estimation of household tap water demand function with correction for sample selection bias," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(14), pages 1079-1082.
    30. Dinusha Dharmaratna & Jaai Parasnis, 2010. "Price Responsiveness of Residential, Industrial and Commercial Water Demand in Sri Lanka," Monash Economics Working Papers 44-10, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    31. Antonio Musolesi & Mario Nosvelli, 2007. "Dynamics of residential water consumption in a panel of Italian municipalities," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 441-444.
    32. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Janda, Karel, 2012. "Demand for gasoline is more price-inelastic than commonly thought," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 201-207.
    33. Marie-Estelle Binet & Fabrizio Carlevaro & Michel Paul, 2014. "Estimation of Residential Water Demand with Imperfect Price Perception," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 59(4), pages 561-581, December.
    34. Ashenfelter, Orley & Harmon, Colm & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1999. "A review of estimates of the schooling/earnings relationship, with tests for publication bias," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 453-470, November.
    35. Diana Zigraiova & Tomas Havranek, 2016. "Bank Competition And Financial Stability: Much Ado About Nothing?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(5), pages 944-981, December.
    36. Havranek, Tomas & Herman, Dominik & Irsova, Zuzana, 2016. "Does Daylight Saving Save Energy? A Meta-Analysis," MPRA Paper 74518, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    37. Nauges, Celine & Strand, Jon, 2007. "Estimation of non-tap water demand in Central American cities," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 165-182, September.
    38. Phoebe Koundouri, "undated". "Econometrics Informing Natural Resources Management:Selected Empirical Analyses," DEOS Working Papers 0401, Athens University of Economics and Business.
    39. Hoffmann, Mark & Worthington, Andrew & Higgs, Helen, 2006. "Urban water demand with fixed volumetric charging in a large municipality: the case of Brisbane, Australia," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 50(3), pages 1-13, September.
    40. Fernando Arbués & Inmaculada Villanúa & Ramón Barberán, 2010. "Household size and residential water demand: an empirical approach ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 54(1), pages 61-80, January.
    41. Henry S. Foster, Jr. & Bruce R. Beattie, 1979. "Urban Residential Demand for Water in the United States," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(1), pages 43-58.
    42. Theara Horn, 2011. "Welfare Effects of Access to Water Service in Cambodia," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(3), pages 2075-2089.
    43. Orley Ashenfelter & Colm Harmon & Hessel Oosterbeek, 1999. "A Review of Estimates of the Schooling/Earnings Relationship, with Tests for Publication Bias," Working Papers 804, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    44. Asci, Serhat & Borisova, Tatiana, 2014. "The Effect of Price and Non-Price Conservation Programs on Residential Water Demand," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170687, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    45. Sylvestre Gaudin & Ronald C. Griffin & Robin C. Sickles, 2001. "Demand Specification for Municipal Water Management: Evaluation of the Stone-Geary Form," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(3), pages 399-422.
    46. Michael L. Nieswiadomy & David J. Molina, 1989. "Comparing Residential Water Demand Estimates under Decreasing and Increasing Block Rates Using Household Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 65(3), pages 280-289.
    47. Maamar Sebri, 2014. "A meta-analysis of residential water demand studies," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 499-520, June.
    48. repec:fth:prinin:425 is not listed on IDEAS
    49. R. G. Taylor & John R. McKean & Robert A. Young, 2004. "Alternate Price Specifications for Estimating Residential Water Demand with Fixed Fees," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 80(3), pages 463-475.
    50. Maamar Sebri, 2013. "Intergovernorate disparities in residential water demand in Tunisia: a discrete/continuous choice approach," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 56(8), pages 1192-1211, October.
    51. Piet Rietveld & Jan Rouwendal & Bert Zwart, 1997. "Estimating Water Demand in Urban Indonesia: A Maximum Likelihood Approach to block Rate Pricing Data," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 97-072/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    52. Aaron Strong & V. Kerry Smith, 2010. "Reconsidering the Economics of Demand Analysis with Kinked Budget Constraints," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 86(1), pages 173-190.
    53. Williams, Martin, 1985. "Estimating urban residential demand for water under alternative price measures," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 213-225, September.
    54. Marie-Estelle Binet & Fabrizio Carlevaro & Michel Paul, 2012. "Estimation of Residential Water Demand with Imprecise Price Perception," Economics Working Paper Archive (University of Rennes 1 & University of Caen) 201233, Center for Research in Economics and Management (CREM), University of Rennes 1, University of Caen and CNRS.
    55. Saleth, R.M. & Dinar, A., 1997. "Satisfying Urban Thirst. Water Supply Augmentation and Pricing Policy in Hyderabad City, India," Papers 395, World Bank - Technical Papers.
    56. David W. Carter & J. Walter Milon, 2005. "Price Knowledge in Household Demand for Utility Services," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(2).
    57. Chris Doucouliagos & T.D. Stanley, 2013. "Are All Economic Facts Greatly Exaggerated? Theory Competition And Selectivity," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(2), pages 316-339, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Cazachevici, Alina & Havranek, Tomas & Horvath, Roman, 2020. "Remittances and economic growth: A meta-analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 134(C).
    2. Milan Ščasný & Šarlota Smutná, 2019. "Estimation of Price and Income Elasticity of Residential Water Demand in the Czech Republic over Three Decades," Working Papers IES 2019/13, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Jun 2019.
    3. Kudela, Peter & Havranek, Tomas & Herman, Dominik & Irsova, Zuzana, 2020. "Does daylight saving time save electricity? Evidence from Slovakia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    4. Jindrich Matousek, 2018. "Individual Discount Rates: A Meta-Analysis of the Experimental Evidence," Working Papers IES 2018/40, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Dec 2018.
    5. Jan Bruha & Jaromir Tonner & Mojmir Hampl & Tomas Havranek & Mirko Djukic & Tibor Hledik & Jiri Polansky & Ljubica Trajcev & Jan Vlcek & Ruslan Aliyev & Dana Hajkova & Ivana Kubicova, 2017. "Effects of Monetary Policy," Occasional Publications - Edited Volumes, Czech National Bank, edition 2, volume 15, number rb15/2 edited by Jan Babecky & Michal Franta & Jan Bruha, March.
    6. Hong, Sanghyun, 2019. "Meta-analysis and publication bias: How well does the FAT-PET-PEESE procedure work? A replication study of Alinaghi & Reed (Research Synthesis Methods, 2018)," International Journal for Re-Views in Empirical Economics (IREE), ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, vol. 3(2019-4), pages 1-22.
    7. Petr Polák, 2019. "The Euro'S Trade Effect: A Meta‐Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 101-124, February.
    8. Anton Astakhov & Tomas Havranek & Jiri Novak, 2019. "Firm Size And Stock Returns: A Quantitative Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(5), pages 1463-1492, December.
    9. Bajzik, Josef & Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Schwarz, Jiri, 2020. "Estimating the Armington elasticity: The importance of study design and publication bias," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
    10. Mojmir Hampl & Tomas Havranek, 2020. "Central Bank Equity as an Instrument of Monetary Policy," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 62(1), pages 49-68, March.
    11. Massarutto, Antonio, 2020. "Servant of too many masters: Residential water pricing and the challenge of sustainability," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    12. Diehlmann, Florian & Klein, Miriam & Wiens, Marcus & Lüttenberg, Markus & Schultmann, Frank, 2020. "On the value of accurate demand information in public-private emergency collaborations," Working Paper Series in Production and Energy 51, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Industrial Production (IIP).
    13. Abel Brodeur & Nikolai Cook & Anthony Heyes, 2020. "Methods Matter: p-Hacking and Publication Bias in Causal Analysis in Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 110(11), pages 3634-3660, November.
    14. Michal Franta & Tibor Hledik & Jan Vlcek & Michal Dvorak & Zlatuse Komarkova & Adam Kucera & Vaclav Broz & Michal Hlavacek, 2018. "Interest Rates," Occasional Publications - Edited Volumes, Czech National Bank, edition 2, volume 16, number rb16/2 edited by Jan Babecky & Volha Audzei, March.
    15. Joachim Schleich & Thomas Hillenbrand, 2019. "Residential water demand responds asymmetrically to rising and falling prices," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(45), pages 4973-4981, September.
    16. Martins, Rita & Antunes, Micaela & Fortunato, Adelino, 2020. "Regulatory changes to Portugal's social tariffs: Carrying water in a sieve?," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    17. Tomas Havranek & Anna Sokolova, 2020. "Do Consumers Really Follow a Rule of Thumb? Three Thousand Estimates from 144 Studies Say 'Probably Not'," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 35, pages 97-122, January.
    18. Frooman, Jeff, 2021. "Where MLM Intersects MFA: Morally Suspect Goods and the Grounds for Regulatory Action," Business Ethics Quarterly, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(1), pages 138-161, January.
    19. Vaclav Broz & Dominika Kolcunova & Simona Malovana & Lukas Pfeifer, 2018. "Risk-Sensitive Capital Regulation," Occasional Publications - Edited Volumes, Czech National Bank, edition 1, volume 16, number rb16/1 edited by Simona Malovana & Jan Frait, March.
    20. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Zeynalova, Olesia, 2017. "Tuition Reduces Enrollment Less Than Commonly Thought," MPRA Paper 78813, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Mojmir Hampl & Tomas Havranek, 2018. "Central Bank Financial Strength and Inflation: A Meta-Analysis," Research and Policy Notes 2018/01, Czech National Bank.
    22. Schleich, Joachim & Hillenbrand, Thomas, 2019. "Water demand responds asymmetrically to rising and falling prices," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S03/2019, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Vlach, Tomas, 2016. "Publication Bias in Measuring the Income Elasticity of Water Demand," MPRA Paper 75247, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Henrique Monteiro, 2010. "Residential Water Demand in Portugal: checking for efficiency-based justifications for increasing block tariffs," Working Papers Series 1 ercwp0110, ISCTE-IUL, Business Research Unit (BRU-IUL).
    3. Ming-Feng Hung & Bin-Tzong Chie & Tai-Hsin Huang, 2017. "Residential water demand and water waste in Taiwan," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 19(2), pages 249-268, April.
    4. Mónica Madonado-Devis & Vicent Almenar-Llongo, 2021. "A Panel Data Estimation of Domestic Water Demand with IRT Tariff Structure: The Case of the City of Valencia (Spain)," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(3), pages 1-26, January.
    5. Ming-Feng Hung & Bin-Tzong Chie, 2013. "Residential Water Use: Efficiency, Affordability, and Price Elasticity," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 27(1), pages 275-291, January.
    6. Arbues, Fernando & Garcia-Valinas, Maria Angeles & Martinez-Espineira, Roberto, 2003. "Estimation of residential water demand: a state-of-the-art review," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 81-102, March.
    7. Darío F. Jiménez & Sergio A. Orrego & Felipe A. Vásquez & Roberto D. Ponce, 2017. "Estimating water demand for urban residential use using a discrete-continuous model and disaggregated data at the household level: the case of the city of Manizales, Colombia," Lecturas de Economía, Universidad de Antioquia, Departamento de Economía, issue 86, pages 153-178, Enero - J.
    8. Céline Nauges & Dale Whittington, 2010. "Estimation of Water Demand in Developing Countries: An Overview," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 25(2), pages 263-294, August.
    9. Jiménez, Darío F. & Orrego, Sergio A. & Vásquez, Felipe A. & Ponce, Roberto D., 2016. "Estimación de la demanda de agua para uso residencial urbano usando un modelo discreto-continuo y datos desagregados a nivel de hogar: el caso de la ciudad de Manizales, Colombia," Revista Lecturas de Economía, Universidad de Antioquia - CIE, issue 86, pages 153-178, December.
    10. Tomas Havranek, Dominik Herman, and Zuzana Irsova, 2018. "Does Daylight Saving Save Electricity? A Meta-Analysis," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    11. Worthington, Andrew C., 2010. "Commercial and Industrial Water Demand Estimation: Theoretical and Methodological Guidelines for Applied Economics Research/Estimación de la demanda de agua comercial e industrial: pautas teóricas y m," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 28, pages 237-258, Agosto.
    12. Acuña, Guillermo, 2017. "Elasticidades de la demanda de agua en Chile [Elasticities of water demand in Chile]," MPRA Paper 82916, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Xiaojia Bao, 2016. "Water, Electricity and Weather Variability in Rural Northern China," Working Papers 2014-07-02, Wang Yanan Institute for Studies in Economics (WISE), Xiamen University.
    14. Shyama Ratnasiri & Clevo Wilson & Wasantha Athukorala & Maria A. Garcia-Valiñas & Benno Torgler & Robert Gifford, 2018. "Effectiveness of two pricing structures on urban water use and conservation: a quasi-experimental investigation," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 20(3), pages 547-560, July.
    15. Dinusha Dharmaratna & Edwyna Harris, 2012. "Estimating Residential Water Demand Using the Stone-Geary Functional Form: The Case of Sri Lanka," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 26(8), pages 2283-2299, June.
    16. Schleich, Joachim & Hillenbrand, Thomas, 2009. "Determinants of residential water demand in Germany," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(6), pages 1756-1769, April.
    17. Joachim Schleich & Thomas Hillenbrand, 2019. "Residential water demand responds asymmetrically to rising and falling prices," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(45), pages 4973-4981, September.
    18. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Janda, Karel & Zilberman, David, 2015. "Selective reporting and the social cost of carbon," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 394-406.
    19. Havranek, Tomas & Rusnak, Marek & Sokolova, Anna, 2017. "Habit formation in consumption: A meta-analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 142-167.
    20. Cazachevici, Alina & Havranek, Tomas & Horvath, Roman, 2020. "Remittances and economic growth: A meta-analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 134(C).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:94:y:2018:i:2:p:259-283. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://le.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.