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The sectoral structure of poverty during an adjustment period: Evidence for Indonesia in the mid-1980s

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  • Huppi, Monika
  • Ravallion, Martin

Abstract

The authors examine the structure of poverty in Indonesia by sector of employment, and how it changed during the adjustment period, 1984 to 1987. They find that, while aggregate poverty decreased during the period, the gains to the poor were quite uneven across regions and sectors. Gains to the rural sector in key regions were quantitatively important to Indonesia's success in alleviating poverty, they found. Most poverty exists -- and most gains in alleviating poverty were made -- in the rural farming sector. These gains were associated with crop diversification and continued growth in off-farm employment. The government's adjustment program favored rural areas and were crucial to Indonesia's evident success at maintaining momentum in alleviating poverty. However, one should not underrate the favorable conditions in Indonesia when adjustment started.
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Suggested Citation

  • Huppi, Monika & Ravallion, Martin, 1991. "The sectoral structure of poverty during an adjustment period: Evidence for Indonesia in the mid-1980s," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 19(12), pages 1653-1678, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:19:y:1991:i:12:p:1653-1678
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Atkinson, A B, 1987. "On the Measurement of Poverty," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(4), pages 749-764, July.
    2. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-766, May.
    3. Ahmed, Sadiq & Chhibber, Ajay, 1989. "How can Indonesia maintain creditworthiness and noninflationary growth ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 291, The World Bank.
    4. Ravallion, Martin & van de Walle, Dominique, 1991. "Urban-rural cost-of-living differentials in a developing economy," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 113-127, January.
    5. Sen, Amartya K, 1976. "Poverty: An Ordinal Approach to Measurement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(2), pages 219-231, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kanbur, Ravi, 2000. "Income distribution and development," Handbook of Income Distribution,in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 13, pages 791-841 Elsevier.
    2. Dorothée Boccanfuso & Antonio Estache & Luc Savard, 2009. "Electricity Reforms In Mali: A Macro-Micro Analysis Of The Effects On Poverty And Distribution," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 77(1), pages 127-147, March.
    3. Friedman, Jed, 2003. "How Responsive is Poverty to Growth? A Regional Analysis of Poverty, Inequality, and Growth in Indonesia, 1984-99," WIDER Working Paper Series 057, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Thorbecke, Erik & Jung, Hong-Sang, 1996. "A multiplier decomposition method to analyze poverty alleviation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 279-300, March.
    5. Lele, Uma & Emerson, Robert & Beilock, Richard P., 1995. "Revisiting Structural Transformation: Ethics, Politics and Economics of Underdevelopment," 1994 Conference, August 22-29, 1994, Harare, Zimbabwe 183382, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Armida Alisjahbana & Chris Manning, 2006. "Labour market dimensions of poverty in Indonesia," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 235-261.
    7. Benfica, Rui M.S., 2007. "Income Poverty Effects of Expansion and Policies in Cash Cropping Economies in Rural Mozambique: An Economy-wide Approach," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56070, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    8. Srijit Mishra, 2015. "Decomposing Poverty Change: Deciphering Change in Total Population and Beyond," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(4), pages 799-811, December.
    9. Simin SEURY, "undated". "Inward Foreign Investment, Corruption and Firm's Ability: Firm-level Evidence from the Transition Economies," EcoMod2009 21500083, EcoMod.
    10. Dorothée BOCCANFUSO & Massa COULABY & Govinda R TIMILSINA & Luc SAVARD, "undated". "Economic and Distributional Impact of Bio-Fuels in Mali," EcoMod2010 259600032, EcoMod.
    11. Stifel, David C. & Thorbecke, Erik, 2003. "A dual-dual CGE model of an archetype African economy: trade reform, migration and poverty," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 207-235, April.
    12. Dorothée Boccanfuso & Antonio Estache & Luc Savard, 2007. "Electricity Reforms in Senegal: A Macro–Micro Analysis of the Effects on Poverty and Distribution," Cahiers de recherche 07-12, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
    13. Decaluwe, B. & Patry, A. & Savard, L. & Thorbecke, E., 1999. "Poverty Analysis Within a General Equilibrium Framework," Papers 9909, Laval - Recherche en Politique Economique.
    14. Reardon, Thomas & Taylor, J. Edward, 1996. "Agroclimatic shock, income inequality, and poverty: Evidence from Burkina Faso," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 901-914, May.
    15. Takao FUKUCHI, 1998. "A Simulation Analysis Of The Urban Informal Sector," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 36(3), pages 225-256, September.
    16. Haddad, Lawrence & Brown, Lynn R. & Richter, Andrea & Smith, Lisa, 1995. "The gender dimensions of economic adjustment policies: Potential interactions and evidence to date," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 881-896, June.
    17. Naylor, Rosamond L. & Falcon, Walter P., 1995. "Is the locus of poverty changing?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 501-518, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation

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