IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/trapol/v71y2018icp116-125.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Imperfect reversibility of fuel demand for road transport: Asymmetric and hysteretic effects of income and price changes in Korea

Author

Listed:
  • Chi, Junwook

Abstract

Existing literature lacks empirical evidence of the potential nonlinear effects of income and price on transport fuel demand. This paper fills this gap by investigating whether the demand responses to income and price changes are asymmetric and hysteretic. To this end, we decompose both income and price into two- and three-component series (one- and two-threshold cases). In the one-threshold case, demand effects for income are symmetric, but asymmetric for fuel price. The results of the two-threshold case show hysteretic effects for price but not for income. More specifically, the results reveal that small price changes do not significantly influence fuel demand for road transport, but substantial increases and cuts in price asymmetrically affect fuel demand, supporting the presence of an inaction band. These findings lead to the conclusion that income has linear demand effects, but demand effects for fuel price are nonlinear; therefore, disregarding nonlinearities in fuel price changes can be restrictive.

Suggested Citation

  • Chi, Junwook, 2018. "Imperfect reversibility of fuel demand for road transport: Asymmetric and hysteretic effects of income and price changes in Korea," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 116-125.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:71:y:2018:i:c:p:116-125
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2018.08.006
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967070X1730642X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wadud, Zia, 2014. "The asymmetric effects of income and fuel price on air transport demand," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 92-102.
    2. Dargay, Joyce & Gately, Dermot, 1997. "The demand for transportation fuels: Imperfect price-reversibility?," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 71-82, February.
    3. Ansgar Belke & Matthias Göcke & Martin Günther, 2013. "Exchange Rate Bands Of Inaction And Play-Hysteresis In German Exports—Sectoral Evidence For Some Oecd Destinations," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(1), pages 152-179, February.
    4. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    5. Daniel J. Graham & Stephen Glaister, 2002. "The Demand for Automobile Fuel: A Survey of Elasticities," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 36(1), pages 1-25, January.
    6. Mariam Camarero & Josep Lluís Carrion‐i‐Silvestre & Cecilio Tamarit, 2006. "Testing for Hysteresis in Unemployment in OECD Countries: New Evidence using Stationarity Panel Tests with Breaks," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(2), pages 167-182, April.
    7. Taylor, John B., 2000. "Low inflation, pass-through, and the pricing power of firms," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(7), pages 1389-1408, June.
    8. Ansgar H. Belke & Matthias Göcke & Laura Werner, 2015. "Exchange Rate Volatility and other Determinants of Hysteresis in Exports – Empirical Evidence for the Euro Area," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 7(1), pages 24-53, June.
    9. Bagnai, Alberto & Mongeau Ospina, Christian Alexander, 2015. "Long- and short-run price asymmetries and hysteresis in the Italian gasoline market," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 41-50.
    10. Chi, Junwook, 2016. "Long- and short-run asymmetric responses of motor-vehicle travel to fuel price variations: New evidence from a nonlinear ARDL approach," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 126-134.
    11. Kannebley Jr., Sergio, 2008. "Tests for the hysteresis hypothesis in Brazilian industrialized exports: A threshold cointegration analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 171-190, March.
    12. Terry O'Shaughnessy, 2011. "Hysteresis in unemployment," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 312-337.
    13. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
    14. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-569 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Fedoseeva, Svetlana & Werner, Laura M., 2014. "Questionning pricing-to-market linearity: partial sum decomposition approach applied to beer exports," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182784, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    16. Dermot Gately & Hiliard G. Huntington, 2002. "The Asymmetric Effects of Changes in Price and Income on Energy and Oil Demand," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 19-55.
    17. repec:eee:joecas:v:13:y:2016:i:c:p:89-99 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Atil, Ahmed & Lahiani, Amine & Nguyen, Duc Khuong, 2014. "Asymmetric and nonlinear pass-through of crude oil prices to gasoline and natural gas prices," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 567-573.
    19. Dermot Gately, 1992. "Imperfect Price-Reversibility of U.S. Gasoline Demand: Asymmetric Responses to Price Increases and Declines," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 179-208.
    20. Verheyen, Florian, 2013. "Exchange rate nonlinearities in EMU exports to the US," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 66-76.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:71:y:2018:i:c:p:116-125. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/30473/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.