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The value of dedicated cyclist and pedestrian infrastructure on rural roads

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  • Laird, James
  • Page, Matthew
  • Shen, Shujie

Abstract

In contrast to urban areas, very little quantitative work has been done on the demand for rural cycling infrastructure and the willingness of users to pay for such infrastructure. Furthermore there is little evidence on the demand for or value of walking infrastructure in either urban or rural areas. The value of and the propensity to walk or cycle in rural areas is likely to be different from that in urban areas, partly due to the distances involved, but also the different levels of traffic. Using evidence from Ireland this paper presents new evidence on the value of pedestrian and cyclist infrastructure in a rural environment. The models are sensitive to the household's location as well as other demographic factors. Average willingness to pay estimates for users of the facilities are 41.0 cents/trip for walking and 19.3 cents/trip for cycling. These results when applied ex ante to a number of proposed rural road upgrades demonstrate that such infrastructure offers value for money. There remain significant barriers to increased participation in walking and cycling, which makes it difficult to estimate demand and willingness to pay models based on data, which do not reveal peoples' attitudes to walking and cycling (e.g. census data).

Suggested Citation

  • Laird, James & Page, Matthew & Shen, Shujie, 2013. "The value of dedicated cyclist and pedestrian infrastructure on rural roads," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 86-96.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:29:y:2013:i:c:p:86-96
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2013.04.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tirachini, Alejandro, 2015. "Probability distribution of walking trips and effects of restricting free pedestrian movement on walking distance," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 101-110.

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