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Self-rated health and social capital in transitional countries: Multilevel analysis of comparative surveys in Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia

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  • Habibov, Nazim N.
  • Afandi, Elvin N.

Abstract

The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of social capital on self-rated health in transitional countries of the South Caucasus region. The study is based on recent, 2009, cross-sectional nationally-representative surveys of 2082 respondents in Armenia, 2014 in Azerbaijan, and 1837 in Georgia with response rate of 78-80%. Two-level random-coefficient ordered logistic regression, modeling individual and community variations in subjective health was estimated to account for the hierarchical structure of the data set which includes individuals nested within communities. The results allow several interesting conclusions to be drawn. First, a proportion of the total variation in self-rated health explained at the community level is 0.23 for Azerbaijan, 0.10 for Georgia, and 0.08 for Armenia. These findings highlight the importance of more decentralized community-based healthcare interventions in the region. Second, human capital covariates remained significant predictors of health status even after controlling for social capital both at individual and community levels. Likewise, social capital variables are significant predictors of health status when used alone and when they are controlled by human capital covariates. These findings suggest that human capital and social capital influence health status independently of each other. Finally, this study sheds light on whether social capital collectively benefits members of a community in transitional countries beyond the individual benefits. In Armenia and Azerbaijan, community level differences in health status are rooted in "compositional" differences between social capital of individuals in the communities rather than at the community "contextual" level. In Georgia, by contrast, the beneficial effect of social capital can be simultaneously observed at the individual "compositional", and community "contextual" levels. These findings suggest that neither "compositional" nor "contextual" models of the social capital effect of health status can apply to all transitional societies universally.

Suggested Citation

  • Habibov, Nazim N. & Afandi, Elvin N., 2011. "Self-rated health and social capital in transitional countries: Multilevel analysis of comparative surveys in Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(7), pages 1193-1204, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:72:y:2011:i:7:p:1193-1204
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Xindong Xue & W. Robert Reed, 2015. "The Relationship Between Social Capital And Health In China," Working Papers in Economics 15/05, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    2. Liu, Gordon G. & Xue, Xindong & Yu, Chenxi & Wang, Yafeng, 2016. "How does social capital matter to the health status of older adults? Evidence from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 177-189.
    3. Agampodi, Thilini Chanchala & Agampodi, Suneth Buddhika & Glozier, Nicholas & Siribaddana, Sisira, 2015. "Measurement of social capital in relation to health in low and middle income countries (LMIC): A systematic review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 95-104.
    4. Elvin Afandi & Majid Kermani & Fuad Mammadov, 2017. "Social capital and entrepreneurial process," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 685-716, September.
    5. Harris Kim, 2014. "The association between social capital measures and self-reported health among Muslim majority nations," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(5), pages 749-757, October.
    6. Sehee Han & Heaseung Kim & Eung-Sun Lee & Hee-Sun Lee, 2013. "The Contextual and Compositional Associations of Social Capital and Subjective Happiness: A Multilevel Analysis from Seoul, South Korea," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 1183-1200, August.
    7. Sehee Han & Heaseung Kim & Hee-Sun Lee, 2013. "A Multilevel Analysis of the Compositional and Contextual Association of Social Capital and Subjective Well-Being in Seoul, South Korea," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 185-202, March.
    8. Nazim Habibov & Elvin Afandi, 2016. "Does Life Satisfaction Determine Subjective Health?," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 11(2), pages 413-428, June.
    9. Nazim Habibov & Elvin Afandi, 2017. "Community-Level Social Capital and Household Strategies for Coping with Global Crisis in Transitional Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 130(2), pages 687-710, January.
    10. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:28:y:2018:i:c:p:38-52 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Looks matter: Attractiveness and employment in the former soviet union," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1604, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    12. Han, Sehee, 2013. "Compositional and contextual associations of social capital and self-rated health in Seoul, South Korea: A multilevel analysis of longitudinal evidence," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 113-120.

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