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Social participation and coronary heart disease: a follow-up study of 6900 women and men in Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Sundquist, Kristina
  • Lindström, Martin
  • Malmström, Marianne
  • Johansson, Sven-Erik
  • Sundquist, Jan

Abstract

Few studies have examined the relationship between social, cultural and religious participation, political empowerment and coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to examine whether low social participation, as described in a social participation index, predicted incidence rates of CHD. This is a follow-up study, from 1990-91 to 31 December 2000, of 6861 Swedish women and men, who were interviewed about their social participation, education, housing tenure and smoking habits. A social participation index was constructed, based on 18 variables from the survey. The outcome measure was CHD morbidity and mortality. Respondents with a CHD incident from 1986 until interview were excluded from the study. Data were analysed using Cox' regression and the results are presented as hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). In the sex- and age-adjusted model there was a gradient between the social participation index and CHD, so that persons with low social participation had the highest risk of CHD with HR=2.15; CI=1.57-2.94, followed by HR=1.67; CI=1.23-2.27 for those with middle social participation. In the full model, when education, housing tenure and smoking habits were included, the increased risk of CHD for persons with low social participation remained high, with HR=1.69, CI=1.21-2.37. We conclude that persons with low social participation in the social participation index exhibited an increased risk of CHD that remained after adjustment for education, housing tenure and smoking habits.

Suggested Citation

  • Sundquist, Kristina & Lindström, Martin & Malmström, Marianne & Johansson, Sven-Erik & Sundquist, Jan, 2004. "Social participation and coronary heart disease: a follow-up study of 6900 women and men in Sweden," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 615-622, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:58:y:2004:i:3:p:615-622
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    Cited by:

    1. Sabel, C.E. & Kihal, W. & Bard, D. & Weber, C., 2013. "Creation of synthetic homogeneous neighbourhoods using zone design algorithms to explore relationships between asthma and deprivation in Strasbourg, France," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 110-121.
    2. Florence Jusot & Michel Grignon & Paul Dourgnon, 2007. "Psychosocial Resources and Social Health Inequalities in France: Exploratory Findings from a General Population Survey," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 2007-05, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    3. Sundquist, Jan & Johansson, Sven-Erik & Yang, Min & Sundquist, Kristina, 2006. "Low linking social capital as a predictor of coronary heart disease in Sweden: A cohort study of 2.8 million people," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(4), pages 954-963, February.
    4. Tarja Nieminen & Tuija Martelin & Seppo Koskinen & Hillevi Aro & Erkki Alanen & Markku Hyyppä, 2010. "Social capital as a determinant of self-rated health and psychological well-being," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 55(6), pages 531-542, December.
    5. Habibov, Nazim N. & Afandi, Elvin N., 2011. "Self-rated health and social capital in transitional countries: Multilevel analysis of comparative surveys in Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(7), pages 1193-1204, April.
    6. Neena Chappell & Laura Funk, 2010. "Social Capital: Does it Add to the Health Inequalities Debate?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 99(3), pages 357-373, December.
    7. Ali, Sadiq M. & Merlo, Juan & Rosvall, Maria & Lithman, Thor & Lindström, Martin, 2006. "Social capital, the miniaturisation of community, traditionalism and first time acute myocardial infarction: A prospective cohort study in southern Sweden," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(8), pages 2204-2217, October.
    8. Ball, Kylie & Cleland, Verity J. & Timperio, Anna F. & Salmon, Jo & Giles-Corti, Billie & Crawford, David A., 2010. "Love thy neighbour? Associations of social capital and crime with physical activity amongst women," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(4), pages 807-814, August.
    9. Islam, M. Kamrul & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Gullberg, Bo & Lindström, Martin & Merlo, Juan, 2008. "Social capital externalities and mortality in Sweden," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 19-42, March.
    10. Ellaway, Anne & Macintyre, Sally, 2007. "Is social participation associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(7), pages 1384-1391, April.
    11. Schultz, Jennifer & O'Brien, A. Maureen & Tadesse, Bedassa, 2008. "Social capital and self-rated health: Results from the US 2006 social capital survey of one community," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(4), pages 606-617, August.
    12. repec:dau:papers:123456789/7007 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Ahnquist, Johanna & Wamala, Sarah P. & Lindstrom, Martin, 2012. "Social determinants of health – A question of social or economic capital? Interaction effects of socioeconomic factors on health outcomes," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(6), pages 930-939.

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