IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/socmed/v63y2006i4p1034-1044.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Individual, neighborhood, and state-level predictors of smoking among US Black women: A multilevel analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Datta, Geetanjali Dabral
  • Subramanian, S.V.
  • Colditz, Graham A.
  • Kawachi, Ichiro
  • Palmer, Julie R.
  • Rosenberg, Lynn

Abstract

Baseline data from the Black Women's Health Study (BWHS) were analyzed to assess the relation of smoking to individual, neighborhood, and state socioeconomic characteristics. Data on smoking status and individual socioeconomic characteristics were obtained via a self-administered postal questionnaire at entry. Neighborhood characteristics of 41,726 never and current smokers were obtained by linking participants' addresses with census tract data from the 1990 US Census. In a multilevel logistic regression model, higher neighborhood poverty was associated with increased smoking prevalence after adjusting for age, education, marital status, and occupation at the individual level, and percent high school graduate, percent college graduate, and percentage Black at the neighborhood level. Relative to women residing in neighborhoods with less than 5% of the residents below the poverty line, the odds ratio was 1.1 (95% confidence interval: 1.0-1.2) for women in neighborhoods with 5-9.9% of the residents below the poverty line, 1.3 (1.2-1.4) for women in neighborhoods with 10-19.9% of the residents below the poverty line, and 1.6 (1.5-1.8) for women in neighborhoods with 20% or more of the residents below poverty. State of residence was also significantly associated with prevalence of current smoking. These results suggest that contextual factors (at both the neighborhood and state level) play a role in Black women's smoking behaviors over and above individual characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Datta, Geetanjali Dabral & Subramanian, S.V. & Colditz, Graham A. & Kawachi, Ichiro & Palmer, Julie R. & Rosenberg, Lynn, 2006. "Individual, neighborhood, and state-level predictors of smoking among US Black women: A multilevel analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(4), pages 1034-1044, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:63:y:2006:i:4:p:1034-1044
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277-9536(06)00144-4
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Subramanian, S. V., 2004. "The relevance of multilevel statistical methods for identifying causal neighborhood effects," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(10), pages 1961-1967, May.
    2. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1991:81:11:1415-1422_2 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Duncan, Craig & Jones, Kelvyn & Moon, Graham, 1999. "Smoking and deprivation: are there neighbourhood effects?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 497-505, February.
    4. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2001:91:11:1847-1850_7 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2002:92:7:1151-1157_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ross, Catherine E., 2000. "Walking, exercising, and smoking: does neighborhood matter?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 265-274, July.
    7. Hart, Carole & Ecob, Russell & Smith, George Davey, 1997. "People, places and coronary heart disease risk factors: A multilevel analysis of the Scottish heart health study archive," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 893-902, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Takeuchi, Kenji & Aida, Jun & Morita, Manabu & Ando, Yuichi & Osaka, Ken, 2012. "Community-level socioeconomic status and parental smoking in Japan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(4), pages 747-751.
    2. Shoff, Carla & Yang, Tse-Chuan, 2013. "Understanding maternal smoking during pregnancy: Does residential context matter?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 50-60.
    3. Burdette, Amy M. & Hill, Terrence D., 2008. "An examination of processes linking perceived neighborhood disorder and obesity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 38-46, July.
    4. Chahine, T. & Subramanian, S.V. & Levy, J.I., 2011. "Sociodemographic and geographic variability in smoking in the U.S.: A multilevel analysis of the 2006-2007 Current Population Survey, Tobacco Use Supplement," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(5), pages 752-758, September.
    5. Oksanen, Tuula & Kouvonen, Anne & Kivimäki, Mika & Pentti, Jaana & Virtanen, Marianna & Linna, Anne & Vahtera, Jussi, 2008. "Social capital at work as a predictor of employee health: Multilevel evidence from work units in Finland," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 637-649, February.
    6. Kendzor, Darla E. & Reitzel, Lorraine R. & Mazas, Carlos A. & Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila M. & Cao, Yumei & Ji, Lingyun & Costello, Tracy J. & Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin & Businelle, Michael S. & Li, Yisheng , 2012. "Individual- and area-level unemployment influence smoking cessation among African Americans participating in a randomized clinical trial," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(9), pages 1394-1401.
    7. Virtanen, Marianna & Kivimäki, Mika & Kouvonen, Anne & Elovainio, Marko & Linna, Anne & Oksanen, Tuula & Vahtera, Jussi, 2007. "Average household income, crime, and smoking behaviour in a local area: The Finnish 10-Town study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(9), pages 1904-1913, May.
    8. Rachel Tolbert Kimbro, 2009. "Acculturation in Context: Gender, Age at Migration, Neighborhood Ethnicity, and Health Behaviors," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1145-1166.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:63:y:2006:i:4:p:1034-1044. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.