IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/soceps/v47y2013i2p89-119.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Multi-regional evaluation of the U.S. electricity sector under technology and policy uncertainties: Findings from MARKAL EPA9rUS modeling

Author

Listed:
  • Balash, Peter
  • Nichols, Christopher
  • Victor, Nadejda

Abstract

The concern of the environmental impacts of electricity generation from fossil fuels and the desire for the country to be less dependent on fossil fuels have resulted in the U.S. Government offering various incentives to promote electricity from renewable sources. The U.S. electricity generation sector faces uncertainties that include future demand, the costs of supply, and the effects of regulation policies. National policies that aim to promote “clean” energy sources may have different impacts for different areas of the country, so it is important to understand the regional effects in addition to the larger national picture. The primary purpose of this paper is to shed some light on the uncertainties associated with the outcomes of possible regulations.

Suggested Citation

  • Balash, Peter & Nichols, Christopher & Victor, Nadejda, 2013. "Multi-regional evaluation of the U.S. electricity sector under technology and policy uncertainties: Findings from MARKAL EPA9rUS modeling," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 89-119.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceps:v:47:y:2013:i:2:p:89-119
    DOI: 10.1016/j.seps.2012.08.002
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038012112000389
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin L. Weitzman, 1974. "Prices vs. Quantities," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(4), pages 477-491.
    2. Bovenberg, A. Lans & Goulder, Lawrence H., 2002. "Environmental taxation and regulation," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 23, pages 1471-1545 Elsevier.
    3. McDonald, Alan & Schrattenholzer, Leo, 2001. "Learning rates for energy technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 255-261, March.
    4. John P. Holdren, 2006. "The Energy Innovation Imperative: Addressing Oil Dependence, Climate Change, and Other 21-super-st Century Energy Challenges," Innovations: Technology, Governance, Globalization, MIT Press, vol. 1(2), pages 3-23, April.
    5. Gillingham, Kenneth & Newell, Richard G. & Pizer, William A., 2008. "Modeling endogenous technological change for climate policy analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 2734-2753, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:appene:v:202:y:2017:i:c:p:447-458 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Yi, Bo-Wen & Xu, Jin-Hua & Fan, Ying, 2016. "Inter-regional power grid planning up to 2030 in China considering renewable energy development and regional pollutant control: A multi-region bottom-up optimization model," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 641-658.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:soceps:v:47:y:2013:i:2:p:89-119. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/seps .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.