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A critical note on the role of the capability approach for sustainability economics

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  • Binder, Martin
  • Witt, Ulrich

Abstract

Can sustainability economics profit from the fusion with Amartya Sen's capability approach, thereby gaining solid normative foundations and wider applicability? We argue that this fusion is mistaken to the extent that the capability approach is essentially a static normative framework while sustainability economics demands a systematic long-term view with focus on wide-ranging societal change. These demands are best realized by taking an evolutionary perspective that focuses on the evolution and development of societies.

Suggested Citation

  • Binder, Martin & Witt, Ulrich, 2012. "A critical note on the role of the capability approach for sustainability economics," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(5), pages 721-725.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:41:y:2012:i:5:p:721-725
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2012.07.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Binder, 2014. "Subjective Well-Being Capabilities: Bridging the Gap Between the Capability Approach and Subjective Well-Being Research," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(5), pages 1197-1217, October.
    2. Mabsout, Ramzi, 2015. "Mindful capability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 86-97.
    3. Remig, Moritz C., 2015. "Unraveling the veil of fuzziness: A thick description of sustainability economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 194-202.
    4. Polzin, Christine & Rauschmayer, Felix & Lilley, Rachel & Whitehead, Mark, 2015. "What could ‘mindful capabilities’ be? A comment on Mabsout's ‘mindful capability’ (2015)," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 355-357.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Capability approach; Sustainability economics; Preference evolution; Behavioural economics;

    JEL classification:

    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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