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Hong Kong's happiness indices: What they tell us about LIFE?

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  • Ho, Lok Sang

Abstract

A series of surveys conducted in Hong Kong since 2005 shows a decline and then a recovery in the happiness index. A series of regression analysis suggests that the recent rise in the happiness index that began ahead of the financial tsunami and continued uninterrupted by the crisis possibly reflected a change in values and attitudes. It was further suggested that the positive or negative feelings associated with any activity may be affected by past events and expectations about the future and may not be intrinsic to the activity. Moreover, one's happiness appears to relate more to emotional than intellectual development, as suggested in indicators on Love, Insight, Fortitude, and Engagement (LIFE). Females appear to have higher scores on all LIFE scores, while one's life goals as well as LIFE scores tend to change as one ages.

Suggested Citation

  • Ho, Lok Sang, 2011. "Hong Kong's happiness indices: What they tell us about LIFE?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 564-572.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:40:y:2011:i:5:p:564-572
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2011.04.013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, 2002. "What Can Economists Learn from Happiness Research?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 402-435, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Happiness; Happiness formula; Time accounting; Prospective happiness; Happiness in process; Retrospective happiness;

    JEL classification:

    • I00 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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