IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/soceco/v39y2010i6p615-618.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The mood of a firm

Author

Listed:
  • Lee, Li Way

Abstract

Mood is information. A good mood signals a desire to cooperate; a bad mood warns of a determination to oppose. Firms may communicate by mood. The paper makes three points about the mood of a firm. First, mood can change. A change in mood affects everyone in the market. Second, there exists a strong tendency for a firm frustrated by poor communication to have bad mood. Bad mood amplifies behavioral responses. Third, the attendant risks of bubbles and panics are a concern about policies that encourage firms to communicate by mood.

Suggested Citation

  • Lee, Li Way, 2010. "The mood of a firm," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 615-618, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:39:y:2010:i:6:p:615-618
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W5H-50F3PK5-4/2/57085078b35ebeb70f71f6cf7ccf9af5
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cao, Melanie & Wei, Jason, 2005. "Stock market returns: A note on temperature anomaly," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1559-1573, June.
    2. Harrison Hong & Jeffrey D. Kubik & Jeremy C. Stein, 2005. "Thy Neighbor's Portfolio: Word-of-Mouth Effects in the Holdings and Trades of Money Managers," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(6), pages 2801-2824, December.
    3. Guttman, Joel M. & Miller, Michael, 1983. "Endogenous conjectural variations in oligopoly," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 4(2-3), pages 249-264.
    4. David Hirshleifer & Tyler Shumway, 2003. "Good Day Sunshine: Stock Returns and the Weather," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 58(3), pages 1009-1032, June.
    5. Saunders, Edward M, Jr, 1993. "Stock Prices and Wall Street Weather," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1337-1345, December.
    6. Harrison Hong & Jeffrey D. Kubik & Jeremy C. Stein, 2004. "Social Interaction and Stock-Market Participation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(1), pages 137-163, February.
    7. Brian M. Lucey & Michael Dowling, 2005. "The Role of Feelings in Investor Decision-Making," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(2), pages 211-237, April.
    8. Shiller, Robert J, 1995. "Conversation, Information, and Herd Behavior," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 181-185, May.
    9. Mark J. Kamstra & Lisa A. Kramer & Maurice D. Levi, 2003. "Winter Blues: A SAD Stock Market Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 324-343, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Keef, Stephen P. & Khaled, Mohammed S., 2011. "A review of the seasonal affective disorder hypothesis," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 959-967.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mood Firm Communication Antitrust;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:39:y:2010:i:6:p:615-618. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.