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Cross-border shopping in a federal economy

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  • Lucas, Vander

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to consider an economy that incorporates cross-border shopping and where the different levels of government are concerned with the well-being of their citizens. We assume a federal economy with a central government and two regions with specific characteristics. Two kinds of externalities, horizontal and vertical, arise and we show the possibilities of internalising them. With the governments of symmetric regions behaving as Nash players, they would optimally set their tax rates and replicate the unitary nation optimum. Finally, we show how the central government as a Stackelberg leader can adjust its fiscal instruments so that the tax externalities are also internalised.
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Suggested Citation

  • Lucas, Vander, 2004. "Cross-border shopping in a federal economy," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 365-385, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:34:y:2004:i:4:p:365-385
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    1. Trandel, Gregory A., 1994. "Interstate commodity tax differentials and the distribution of residents," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 435-457, March.
    2. Nielsen, Soren Bo, 2001. " A Simple Model of Commodity Taxation and Cross-Border Shopping," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 103(4), pages 599-623, December.
    3. Ohsawa, Yoshiaki, 1999. "Cross-border shopping and commodity tax competition among governments," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 33-51, January.
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    7. You-Qiang Wang, 1999. "Commodity Taxes under Fiscal Competition: Stackelberg Equilibrium and Optimality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 974-981, September.
    8. Hoyt, William H., 2001. "Tax Policy Coordination, Vertical Externalities, and Optimal Taxation in a System of Hierarchical Governments," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 491-516, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:itaxpf:v:24:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10797-016-9435-y is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Willem Sas, 2015. "Commuting in a federation: Horizontal and vertical tax externalities revisited," ERSA conference papers ersa15p690, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Dascher, Kristof & Haupt, Alexander, 2011. "The political economy of regional integration projects at borders where poor and rich meet: The role of cross-border shopping and community sorting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 148-164, January.
    4. Devereux, M.P. & Lockwood, B. & Redoano, M., 2007. "Horizontal and vertical indirect tax competition: Theory and some evidence from the USA," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(3-4), pages 451-479, April.
    5. Aiura, Hiroshi & Ogawa, Hikaru, 2013. "Unit tax versus ad valorem tax: A tax competition model with cross-border shopping," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 30-38.
    6. Desiderio Romero-Jordán & Marta Jorge García-Inés & Santiago Álvarez García, 2013. "The impact of fuel tourism on retailers’ diesel price in Spanish neighbouring regions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 407-413, February.
    7. Leal, Andrés & López-Laborda, Julio & Rodrigo, Fernando, 2009. "Prices, taxes and automotive fuel cross-border shopping," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 225-234.
    8. Diego Martínez, 2014. "Vertical externalities revisited: new results with public inputs and unit taxation," Working Papers. Collection A: Public economics, governance and decentralization 1403, Universidade de Vigo, GEN - Governance and Economics research Network.
    9. Kristof Dascher & Alexander Haupt, 2008. "The Political Economy of Regional Integration Projects at Borders where Rich and Poor Meet: The Role of Cross-Border Shopping and Community Sorting," CESifo Working Paper Series 2280, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Todd M. Nesbit, 2005. "The Revenue Impacts of Cross-border Sales and Tourism: Wine and Liquor Taxation," Working Papers 05-12 Classification-, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    11. Braid, Ralph M., 2013. "State and local tax competition in a spatial model with sales taxes and residential property taxes," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 57-67.
    12. Yoskowitz, David W. & Pisani, Michael J., 2007. "Risk and reward: Currency substitution and acceptance of the Mexican peso by firms in the United States southern frontier," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 422-434, July.
    13. Kazuko Miyamoto, 2009. "A New Approach to Estimating Tax Interactions in Fiscal Federalism," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd08-053, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H7 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations
    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis

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