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Should the government directly intervene in stock market during a crisis?

  • Khan, Salman
  • Batteau, Pierre
Registered author(s):

    Unlike foreign exchange markets where central banks frequently intervene, the governments strive not to intervene in the stock markets since intervention transmit negative signals and carry market-related side effects. The main reasons often cited in support of intervention are to bring price stability and to restore investors’ confidence. During the recent economic turmoil, opportunities for the governments to intervene in the stock markets were mainly exploited in emerging and developing countries. We study the outcome of the Russian government's intervention in its major stock market between September and October 2008. This intervention was intended to reverse the sudden and swift declining trend in traded security prices by altering the market's expectations. By using a combination of event study and a multivariate GARCH model, our findings does not support direct government intervention in the stock market during a crisis.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1062976911000263
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance.

    Volume (Year): 51 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 350-359

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:51:y:2011:i:4:p:350-359
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620167

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