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Volatility and error transmission spillover effects: Evidence from three European financial regions

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  • Koulakiotis, Athanasios
  • Dasilas, Apostolos
  • Papasyriopoulos, Nicholas

Abstract

This study uses the multivariate GARCH-BEKK modelling approach to examine the transmission of news (both volatility and error) between portfolios of cross-listed equities within three European financial regions, that is, the Scandinavian (Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway), the Germanic (Austria, Switzerland and Germany) and the French area (Brussels, France, Italy, Holland and Spain). We find that the Finnish and Danish portfolios of cross-listed equities are the main transmitters of volatility relative to the Swedish and Norwegian portfolios of cross-listed equities. On the other hand, the Swiss portfolio of cross-listed equities is the major exporter of volatility and error to the other portfolios of cross-listed equities in the Germanic stock market area. Finally, the Paris, Amsterdam and Brussels stock exchanges are the major exporters of volatility and error to the portfolios of cross-listed equities traded on the Milan and Madrid stock exchanges.

Suggested Citation

  • Koulakiotis, Athanasios & Dasilas, Apostolos & Papasyriopoulos, Nicholas, 2009. "Volatility and error transmission spillover effects: Evidence from three European financial regions," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 858-869, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:49:y:2009:i:3:p:858-869
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    Cited by:

    1. Rombouts, Jeroen & Stentoft, Lars & Violante, Franceso, 2014. "The value of multivariate model sophistication: An application to pricing Dow Jones Industrial Average options," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 78-98.
    2. Weber, Enzo, 2013. "Simultaneous stochastic volatility transmission across American equity markets," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 53-60.
    3. Afees A. Salisu & Kazeem Isah, 2017. "Modeling the spillovers between stock market and money market in Nigeria," Working Papers 023, Centre for Econometric and Allied Research, University of Ibadan.
    4. Naseri, Marjan & Masih, Mansur, 2014. "Integration and Comovement of Developed and Emerging Islamic Stock Markets: A Case Study of Malaysia," MPRA Paper 58799, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Babajide Fowowe & Mohammed Shuaibu, 2016. "Dynamic spillovers between Nigerian, South African and international equity markets," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 148, pages 59-80.
    6. Cardona, Laura & Gutiérrez, Marcela & Agudelo, Diego A., 2017. "Volatility transmission between US and Latin American stock markets: Testing the decoupling hypothesis," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, pages 115-127.

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