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Heckle and Chide: Results of a randomized road safety intervention in Kenya

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  • Habyarimana, James
  • Jack, William

Abstract

We report the results of a randomized field experiment aimed at improving the safety of long-distance mini-busses or matatus in Kenya. Our intervention combines evocative messages aimed at motivating passengers to speak up against bad driving with a lottery that rewards matatu drivers for keeping the stickers in place. Independent insurance claims data were collected for more than 2000 long-distance matatus before and after the intervention. Our results indicate that insurance claims fell by a half to two-thirds, from a baseline annual rate of about 10%, and that claims involving injury or death fell by 60%. While we are unable to identify the mechanism(s) underlying this effect, the intervention is more cost effective in reducing mortality than other documented public health interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Habyarimana, James & Jack, William, 2011. "Heckle and Chide: Results of a randomized road safety intervention in Kenya," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1438-1446.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:95:y:2011:i:11:p:1438-1446
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpubeco.2011.06.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dean T. Jamison & Joel G. Breman & Anthony R. Measham & George Alleyne & Mariam Claeson & David B. Evans & Prabhat Jha & Ann Mills & Philip Musgrove, 2006. "Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries, Second Edition," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7242.
    2. Habyarimana, James & Jack, William, 2011. "Heckle and Chide: Results of a randomized road safety intervention in Kenya," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1438-1446.
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    Cited by:

    1. Habyarimana, James & Jack, William, 2011. "Heckle and Chide: Results of a randomized road safety intervention in Kenya," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1438-1446.
    2. Peters, Jörg & Langbein, Jörg & Roberts, Gareth, 2016. "Policy evaluation, randomized controlled trials, and external validity—A systematic review," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 51-54.
    3. repec:eee:pubeco:v:155:y:2017:i:c:p:11-20 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Bengtsson, Niklas, 2015. "Efficient informal trade: Theory and experimental evidence from the Cape Town taxi market," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 85-98.
    5. Lu, Fangwen & Zhang, Jinan & Perloff, Jeffrey M., 2016. "General and specific information in deterring traffic violations: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 97-107.
    6. James Habyarimana & William Jack, 2014. "State versus Consumer Regulation: An Evaluation of Two Road Safety Interventions in Kenya," NBER Chapters,in: African Successes, Volume I: Government and Institutions, pages 307-330 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ferraro, Paul J. & Miranda, Juan José, 2013. "Heterogeneous treatment effects and mechanisms in information-based environmental policies: Evidence from a large-scale field experiment," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 356-379.
    8. Pascaline Dupas & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries," NBER Working Papers 22235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    Keywords

    Road safety;

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