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Exchange rate exposure in the Asian emerging markets


  • Lin, Chien-Hsiu


This paper investigates the impact of foreign exchange rate change on stock returns in the Asian emerging markets. The asymmetric exchange exposure framework and real exchange rates are used in this paper to capture the different exposures between currency appreciation and depreciation and the high inflation effect in the emerging markets. My empirical results show that there did exist extensive exchange rate exposure in the Asian emerging markets from 1997 to 2010. Moreover, foreign exchange exposure became more significant or greater during the 1997 Asian crisis and the 2008 global crisis periods, despite the frequent central banks' interventions during these periods. The greater exchange exposure during the crisis periods can be attributable to net exporters or firms with dollar assets, implying that firms can reduce exchange exposures by decreasing their export ratio or dollar assets holding during times of crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Lin, Chien-Hsiu, 2011. "Exchange rate exposure in the Asian emerging markets," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 224-238, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:mulfin:v:21:y:2011:i:4:p:224-238

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Tsai, I-Chun & Chiang, Ming-Chu & Tsai, Huey-Cherng & Liou, Chia-Ho, 2014. "Hot money effect or foreign exchange exposure? Investigation of the exchange rate exposures of Taiwanese industries," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 75-96.
    3. Long, Ling & Tsui, Albert K. & Zhang, Zhaoyong, 2014. "Estimating time-varying currency betas with contagion: New evidence from developed and emerging financial markets," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 10-24.
    4. Akay, Gokhan H. & Cifter, Atilla, 2014. "Exchange rate exposure at the firm and industry levels: Evidence from Turkey," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 426-434.
    5. Ye, Min & Hutson, Elaine & Muckley, Cal, 2014. "Exchange rate regimes and foreign exchange exposure: The case of emerging market firms," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 156-182.
    6. Hooy Chee-Wooi & Robert D. Brooks, 2015. "The Components of Systematic Risk and Their Determinants in The Malaysian Equity Market," Asian Academy of Management Journal of Accounting and Finance (AAMJAF), Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, vol. 11(2), pages 151-176.
    7. Lestano, Lestano, 2015. "Asymmetric Exchange Rate Exposure in Indonesian Industry Sectors," MPRA Paper 64357, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Jayasinghe, Prabhath & Tsui, Albert K. & Zhang, Zhaoyong, 2014. "New estimates of time-varying currency betas: A trivariate BEKK approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 128-139.


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