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The intended and unintended consequences of financial-market regulations: A general-equilibrium analysis

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  • Buss, Adrian
  • Dumas, Bernard
  • Uppal, Raman
  • Vilkov, Grigory

Abstract

In a production economy with trade in financial markets motivated by the desire to share labor-income risk and to speculate, we show that speculation increases volatility of asset returns and investment growth, increases the equity risk premium, and reduces welfare. Regulatory measures, such as constraints on stock positions, borrowing constraints, and the Tobin tax have similar effects on financial and macroeconomic variables. However, borrowing constraints and the Tobin tax are more successful than constraints on stock positions at improving welfare because they substantially reduce speculative trading without impairing excessively risk-sharing trades.

Suggested Citation

  • Buss, Adrian & Dumas, Bernard & Uppal, Raman & Vilkov, Grigory, 2016. "The intended and unintended consequences of financial-market regulations: A general-equilibrium analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 25-43.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:81:y:2016:i:c:p:25-43
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2016.03.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Johannes Muhle-Karbe & Marcel Nutz & Xiaowei Tan, 2019. "Asset Pricing with Heterogeneous Beliefs and Illiquidity," Papers 1905.05730, arXiv.org.
    2. Steven D. Baker & Burton Hollifield & Emilio Osambela, 2018. "Preventing Controversial Catastrophes," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2018-052, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    3. Martin Herdegen & Johannes Muhle-Karbe & Dylan Possamai, 2019. "Equilibrium Asset Pricing with Transaction Costs," Papers 1901.10989, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2019.
    4. Maurizio MOTOLESE & NAKATA Hiroyuki, 2016. "Endogenous Fluctuations and Social Welfare under Credit Constraints and Heterogeneous Beliefs," Discussion papers 16082, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tobin tax; Borrowing constraints; Short-sale constraints; Stock market volatility; Differences of opinion;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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