IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Migration modelling in the New Economic Geography

  • Camacho, Carmen

It is our aim to study some of the migration laws utilized in Economic Geography, their dynamic properties and how their long-run predictions and stability change with the specificities of the economic models under consideration. After a thorough description of Fujita and Thisse (2002), we introduce a different migration law à la Krugman (1991a). Although individuals do not foresee price changes, the steady state outcome does not vary qualitatively: the unique steady state is a symmetric distribution of skilled labour across regions. We can prove that this interior steady state is asymptotically stable, which represents a net improvement in the dynamic analysis of the long run with respect to Fujita and Thisse. When we model the economy using the Romer (1990) model applied to two regions and allowing for inter-regional skilled migration, then there exists a solution path that converges to an asymmetric steady state. In effect, the new steady state depends on technology, fixed costs, knowledge spillovers and transportation costs.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Mathematical Social Sciences.

Volume (Year): 66 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 233-244

in new window

Handle: RePEc:eee:matsoc:v:66:y:2013:i:3:p:233-244
Contact details of provider: Web page:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Ottaviano, Gianmarco, 1996. "Monopolistic Competition, Trade, and Endogenous Spatial Fluctuations," CEPR Discussion Papers 1327, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-99, June.
  3. BOUCEKKINE, Raouf & CAMACHO, Carmen & ZOU, Benteng, 2006. "Bridging the gap between growth theory and the new economic geography: the spatial Ramsey model," CORE Discussion Papers 2006072, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  4. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Endogenous Technological Change," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2135, David K. Levine.
  5. Camacho, Carmen & Pérez-Barahona, Agustín, 2015. "Land use dynamics and the environment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 96-118.
  6. Ottaviano, Gianmarco & Puga, Diego, 1997. "Agglomeration in the Global Economy: A Survey of the 'New Economic Geography'," CEPR Discussion Papers 1699, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Michael Kremer, 1993. "The O-Ring Theory of Economic Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 551-575.
  8. Carmen Camacho, 2013. "Spatial migration," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13017, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  9. Picard, P. M. & Toulemonde, E., 2003. "Regional asymmetries: economies of agglomeration versus unionized labor markets," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 223-249, March.
  10. Brunner, Martin & Strulik, Holger, 2002. "Solution of perfect foresight saddlepoint problems: a simple method and applications," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 737-753, May.
  11. Paul Krugman, 1991. "History versus Expectations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 651-667.
  12. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
  13. Beine, Michel & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 275-289, February.
  14. Giovanni Peri & Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 2005. "Rethinking the Gains from Immigration: Theory and Evidence from the U.S," Working Papers 58, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  15. Steven C. Salop, 1979. "Monopolistic Competition with Outside Goods," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(1), pages 141-156, Spring.
  16. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00674020 is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Mossay, Pascal, 2013. "A theory of rational spatial agglomerations," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 385-394.
  18. Mussa, Michael, 1978. "Dynamic Adjustment in the Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 775-91, October.
  19. Kyoji Fukao & Roland Benabou, 1993. "History Versus Expectations: A Comment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(2), pages 535-542.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:matsoc:v:66:y:2013:i:3:p:233-244. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shamier, Wendy)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.