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Exclusionary policies in urban development: Under-servicing migrant households in Brazilian cities

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  • Feler, Leo
  • Henderson, J. Vernon

Abstract

Localities in developed countries often enact regulations to deter low-income households from moving in. In developing countries, such restrictions lead to the emergence of informal housing sectors. To deter low-income migrants, localities in developing countries withhold public services to the informal housing sector. Using a large sample of Brazilian localities, we examine migration and exclusion, focusing on the public provision of water to small houses where low-income migrants are likely to live. Withholding water connections reduces the locality growth rate, particularly of low-education households. In terms of service provision, during dictatorship in Brazil, we find evidence of strategic exclusion, where localities appear to withhold services to deter in-migration. We also find evidence of strategic interactions among localities within metro areas in their setting of service levels: if one locality provides more services to migrant households, other localities respond by withholding service.

Suggested Citation

  • Feler, Leo & Henderson, J. Vernon, 2011. "Exclusionary policies in urban development: Under-servicing migrant households in Brazilian cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 253-272, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:69:y:2011:i:3:p:253-272
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cavalcanti Ferreira, Pedro & Monge-Naranjo, Alexander & Torres de Mello Pereira, Luciene, 2016. "Of Cities and Slums," Working Papers 2016-22, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    2. Julia A. Barde & Juliana Walkiewicz, 2014. "Access to Piped Water and Human Capital Formation - Evidence from Brazilian Primary Schools," Discussion Paper Series 28, Department of International Economic Policy, University of Freiburg, revised Jul 2014.
    3. Gollin, Douglas & Kirchberger, Martina & Lagakos, David, 2017. "In Search of a Spatial Equilibrium in the Developing World," CEPR Discussion Papers 12114, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Gilles Duranton, 2015. "Growing through Cities in Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 30(1), pages 39-73.
    5. Nora Ruth Libertun de Duren & Roberto Guerrero Compeán, 2015. "Growing Resources for Growing Cities: Density and the Cost of Municipal Public Services in Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, and Mexico," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 7332, Inter-American Development Bank.
    6. Miquel-Àngel Garcia-López & Ana I. Moreno-Monroy, 2018. "Income segregation in monocentric and polycentric cities: does urban form really matter?," Working Papers 2018/17, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    7. Fox, Sean, 2014. "The Political Economy of Slums: Theory and Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 191-203.
    8. Chauvin, Juan Pablo & Glaeser, Edward & Ma, Yueran & Tobio, Kristina, 2017. "What is different about urbanization in rich and poor countries? Cities in Brazil, China, India and the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 17-49.
    9. Lee, Yong Suk, 2015. "School districting and the origins of residential land price inequality," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 1-17.
    10. Mariaflavia Harari & Maisy Wong, 2018. "Slum Upgrading and Long-run Urban Development: Evidence from Indonesia," 2018 Meeting Papers 367, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    11. Parikh, Priti & Fu, Kun & Parikh, Himanshu & McRobie, Allan & George, Gerard, 2015. "Infrastructure Provision, Gender, and Poverty in Indian Slums," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 468-486.
    12. Jedwab, Remi & Christiaensen, Luc & Gindelsky, Marina, 2017. "Demography, urbanization and development: Rural push, urban pull and…urban push?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 6-16.
    13. Kesztenbaum, Lionel & Rosenthal, Jean-Laurent, 2017. "Sewers’ diffusion and the decline of mortality: The case of Paris, 1880–1914," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 174-186.
    14. Kahn, Matthew E., 2015. "Climate Change Adaptation: Lessons from Urban Economics," Strategic Behavior and the Environment, now publishers, vol. 5(1), pages 1-30, June.
    15. repec:eee:deveco:v:134:y:2018:i:c:p:289-309 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Eric Heikkila & Michael Lin, 2014. "An integrated model of formal and informal housing sectors," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 52(1), pages 121-140, January.
    17. McGranahan, Gordon, 2015. "Realizing the Right to Sanitation in Deprived Urban Communities: Meeting the Challenges of Collective Action, Coproduction, Affordability, and Housing Tenure," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 242-253.
    18. repec:eee:regeco:v:71:y:2018:i:c:p:62-79 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Coleman, Nicholas & Feler, Leo, 2014. "Bank Ownership, Lending, and Local Economic Performance During the 2008-2010 Financial Crisis," International Finance Discussion Papers 1099, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    20. Sharma, Ajay & Chandrasekhar, S., 2014. "Growth of the Urban Shadow, Spatial Distribution of Economic Activities, and Commuting by Workers in Rural and Urban India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 154-166.
    21. Chen, Ying & Henderson, J. Vernon & Cai, Wei, 2017. "Political favoritism in China’s capital markets and its effect on city sizes," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 69-87.
    22. Matthew E. Kahn, 2015. "A Review of The Age of Sustainable Development by Jeffrey Sachs," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(3), pages 654-666, September.
    23. Michael Greenstone & B. Kelsey Jack, 2013. "Envirodevonomics: A Research Agenda for a Young Field," NBER Working Papers 19426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Brueckner, Jan K. & Lall, Somik V., 2015. "Cities in Developing Countries," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    25. Du The Huynh & Richard B. Peiser, 2016. "From Spontaneous to Planned Urban Development and Quality of Life: the Case of Ho Chi Minh City," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 11(4), pages 1357-1377, December.

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