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Enclave development and ‘offshore corporate social responsibility’: Implications for oil-rich sub-Saharan Africa


  • Ackah-Baidoo, Abigail


This paper critically reflects on the challenges of engaging, proactively, in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in oil-rich sub-Saharan Africa. Most of the region's oil production takes place in enclave-type environments offshore and in countries ruled by autocratic governments which generally exert minimal pressure on companies to embrace CSR. With companies having little sense of who to target in their local economic development policies and programs, there is always a possibility of ‘offshore CSR’ – recognized here as potentially-effective ideas for improving social welfare that linger within the enclave and never fully materialize – surfacing. The aim is to conceptualize and broaden understanding of the challenge of developing CSR programs in these settings, where there are no clear linkages to communities or local economies more generally.

Suggested Citation

  • Ackah-Baidoo, Abigail, 2012. "Enclave development and ‘offshore corporate social responsibility’: Implications for oil-rich sub-Saharan Africa," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 152-159.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jrpoli:v:37:y:2012:i:2:p:152-159 DOI: 10.1016/j.resourpol.2011.12.010

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hilson, Gavin, 2014. "The extractive industries and development in sub-Saharan Africa: An introduction," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 1-3.
    2. Ayelazuno, Jasper, 2014. "Oil wealth and the well-being of the subaltern classes in Sub-Saharan Africa: A critical analysis of the resource curse in Ghana," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 66-73.
    3. Van Alstine, James & Manyindo, Jacob & Smith, Laura & Dixon, Jami & AmanigaRuhanga, Ivan, 2014. "Resource governance dynamics: The challenge of ‘new oil’ in Uganda," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 48-58.
    4. Milica Maricic & Milica Kostic-Stankovic, 2016. "Towards an impartial Responsible Competitiveness Index: a twofold multivariate I-distance approach," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 103-120, January.
    5. Santos, Carlos Filipe & Fuinhas, José Alberto & Marques, António Cardoso, 2014. "O nexus energia-crescimento e o nível da auto-suficiência na produção de petróleo: análise com macro painel
      [Energy-growth nexus and oil self-sufficiency: macro panel analysis]
      ," MPRA Paper 57008, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Xiping Pan & Jinghua Sha & Hongliang Zhang & Wenlan Ke, 2014. "Relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility and Financial Performance in the Mineral Industry: Evidence from Chinese Mineral Firms," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(7), pages 1-25, June.
    7. Van Alstine, James & Barkemeyer, Ralf, 2014. "Business and development: Changing discourses in the extractive industries," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 4-16.
    8. Roy Maconachie & Radhika Srinivasan & Nicholas Menzies, 2015. "Responding to the Challenge of Fragility and Security in West Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 22511, The World Bank.
    9. Hilson, Gavin & Hilson, Abigail & McQuilken, James, 2016. "Ethical minerals: Fairer trade for whom?," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 232-247.
    10. Milica Maricic & Milica Kostic-Stankovic, 2016. "Towards an impartial Responsible Competitiveness Index: a twofold multivariate I-distance approach," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 103-120, January.


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