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Does financial development cause economic growth? Implication for policy in Korea

  • Yang, Yung Y.
  • Yi, Myung Hoon

The causal relationship between financial development and economic growth is examined, utilizing the superexogeneity methodology. We use annual data for Korea during 1971-2002, during which Korea has experienced both phenomenal economic growth and a variety of financial liberalization and reforms. In our tests for superexogeneity, we find that financial development control causes economic growth, but the reverse is not true. Our empirical results provide evidence in favor of the 'finance causes growth' view for the case of Korea while rejecting the 'growth causes finance' view. The policy implication is that Korea should give policy priority to financial reform rather than economic growth, because only a decisive and accelerated pace of financial restructuring can ensure a sustainable growth in the medium or long term.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Policy Modeling.

Volume (Year): 30 (2008)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 827-840

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:30:y:2008:i:5:p:827-840
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505735

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