IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jotrge/v74y2019icp395-404.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Bicycle train intermodality: Effects of demography, station characteristics and the built environment

Author

Listed:
  • Weliwitiya, Hesara
  • Rose, Geoffrey
  • Johnson, Marilyn

Abstract

As public transport patronage levels increase worldwide, an issue many cities face is providing adequate infrastructure capacity for station access modes. A cost effective solution is to encourage the use of the bicycle for the ‘first mile’ link, particularly for rail commuters who currently drive but are within a cycling distance of the station. However, to promote cycling as a station access mode, a better understanding of the associated correlates are needed. This study aims to address this knowledge gap by identifying factors associated with increased rates of bicycle access to stations in Melbourne, Australia. Bicycle access counts at 207 metropolitan rail stations were analysed and factors related to the rail station catchment areas (demographic data and built/natural environment) and rail station characteristics were considered. Visual representation of the demographic and built/natural environment characteristics and eight generalized linear models were developed to identify significant factors. A higher number of cyclists riding to the station were associated with a range of factors including built/natural environments: low sloping terrain; greater proportion of low speed local roads, diverse land use mix and increased bicycle crash count density. Station attributes: availability of secure bicycle parking facilities, increased train patronage, higher train frequency during the morning peak period and demographic characteristics: increasing median age were also correlated with a growth in bicycle access counts to stations.

Suggested Citation

  • Weliwitiya, Hesara & Rose, Geoffrey & Johnson, Marilyn, 2019. "Bicycle train intermodality: Effects of demography, station characteristics and the built environment," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 395-404.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jotrge:v:74:y:2019:i:c:p:395-404
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2018.12.016
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0966692318306112
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pucher, John & Garrard, Jan & Greaves, Stephen, 2011. "Cycling down under: a comparative analysis of bicycling trends and policies in Sydney and Melbourne," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 332-345.
    2. Hidalgo, Dario & Huizenga, Cornie, 2013. "Implementation of sustainable urban transport in Latin America," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 66-77.
    3. Givoni, Moshe & Rietveld, Piet, 2007. "The access journey to the railway station and its role in passengers' satisfaction with rail travel," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 357-365, September.
    4. Brons, Martijn & Givoni, Moshe & Rietveld, Piet, 2009. "Access to railway stations and its potential in increasing rail use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 136-149, February.
    5. Debrezion, Ghebreegziabiher & Pels, Eric & Rietveld, Piet, 2009. "Modelling the joint access mode and railway station choice," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 270-283, January.
    6. Krygsman, Stephan & Dijst, Martin & Arentze, Theo, 2004. "Multimodal public transport: an analysis of travel time elements and the interconnectivity ratio," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 265-275, July.
    7. Vandenbulcke, Grégory & Dujardin, Claire & Thomas, Isabelle & Geus, Bas de & Degraeuwe, Bart & Meeusen, Romain & Panis, Luc Int, 2011. "Cycle commuting in Belgium: Spatial determinants and 're-cycling' strategies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 118-137, February.
    8. Martens, Karel, 2007. "Promoting bike-and-ride: The Dutch experience," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 326-338, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Pucher, John & Buehler, Ralph & Seinen, Mark, 2011. "Bicycling renaissance in North America? An update and re-appraisal of cycling trends and policies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 451-475, July.
    2. Cheng, Yung-Hsiang & Liu, Kuo-Chu, 2012. "Evaluating bicycle-transit users’ perceptions of intermodal inconvenience," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1690-1706.
    3. Zhao, Pengjun & Li, Shengxiao, 2017. "Bicycle-metro integration in a growing city: The determinants of cycling as a transfer mode in metro station areas in Beijing," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 46-60.
    4. Mohanty, Sudatta & Bansal, Sugam & Bairwa, Khushi, 2017. "Effect of integration of bicyclists and pedestrians with transit in New Delhi," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 31-40.
    5. Vincent Chakour & Naveen Eluru, 2014. "Analyzing commuter train user behavior: a decision framework for access mode and station choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 211-228, January.
    6. Kager, R. & Bertolini, L. & Te Brömmelstroet, M., 2016. "Characterisation of and reflections on the synergy of bicycles and public transport," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 208-219.
    7. Yanjie Ji & Xinwei Ma & Mingyuan Yang & Yuchuan Jin & Liangpeng Gao, 2018. "Exploring Spatially Varying Influences on Metro-Bikeshare Transfer: A Geographically Weighted Poisson Regression Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(5), pages 1-23, May.
    8. Givoni, Moshe & Rietveld, Piet, 2014. "Do cities deserve more railway stations? The choice of a departure railway station in a multiple-station region," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 89-97.
    9. Sharav, Nir & Givoni, Moshe & Shiftan, Yoram, 2019. "What transit service does the periphery need? A case study of Israel’s rural country," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 320-333.
    10. Chung-Cheng Lu, 2016. "Robust Multi-period Fleet Allocation Models for Bike-Sharing Systems," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 61-82, March.
    11. Ralph Buehler & John Pucher, 2012. "Cycling to work in 90 large American cities: new evidence on the role of bike paths and lanes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 409-432, March.
    12. Muhammad Zudhy Irawan & Prawira Fajarindra Belgiawan & Tri Basuki Joewono & Nurvita I. M. Simanjuntak, 2020. "Do motorcycle-based ride-hailing apps threaten bus ridership? A hybrid choice modeling approach with latent variables," Public Transport, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 207-231, March.
    13. Lahoorpoor, Bahman & Levinson, David M., 2020. "Catchment if you can: The effect of station entrance and exit locations on accessibility," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 82(C).
    14. Zgheib, Najib & Abou-Zeid, Maya & Kaysi, Isam, 2020. "Modeling demand for ridesourcing as feeder for high capacity mass transit systems with an application to the planned Beirut BRT," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 70-91.
    15. Lindsey, Marshall & Schofer, Joseph L. & Durango-Cohen, Pablo & Gray, Kimberly A., 2010. "Relationship between proximity to transit and ridership for journey-to-work trips in Chicago," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(9), pages 697-709, November.
    16. Roberto Sañudo & Eneko Echaniz & Borja Alonso & Rubén Cordera, 2019. "Addressing the Importance of Service Attributes in Railways," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(12), pages 1-20, June.
    17. Sadhukhan, Shubhajit & Banerjee, Uttam K. & Maitra, Bhargab, 2016. "Commuters’ willingness-to-pay for improvement of transfer facilities in and around metro stations – A case study in Kolkata," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 43-58.
    18. Kevin Chan & Steven Farber, 2020. "Factors underlying the connections between active transportation and public transit at commuter rail in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area," Transportation, Springer, vol. 47(5), pages 2157-2178, October.
    19. Ying Ni & Jiaqi Chen, 2020. "Exploring the Effects of the Built Environment on Two Transfer Modes for Metros: Dockless Bike Sharing and Taxis," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(5), pages 1-1, March.
    20. Givoni, Moshe & Rietveld, Piet, 2007. "The access journey to the railway station and its role in passengers' satisfaction with rail travel," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 357-365, September.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jotrge:v:74:y:2019:i:c:p:395-404. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Haili He). General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-transport-geography .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.