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Catchment if you can: The effect of station entrance and exit locations on accessibility

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  • Lahoorpoor, Bahman
  • Levinson, David M.

Abstract

The success of passenger railway systems depends on their ridership and thus the population they serve. A mechanism to increase ridership is to expose the existing system to more people by reconfiguring the station itself, for instance by adding extra entrance and exit gates to shorten the walking distance from a trip's origin or its final destination. Gates are key nodes giving pedestrians access from street network to boarding/alighting facilities and vice versa. Stations and platforms are places not points, passengers may spend up to 6 min a trip walking between platforms and the end of the station nearest their origin or destination. This study systematically evaluates the accessibility of train stations and the effect of constructing an additional ‘far-side’ gate at stations with a single ‘near-side’ entrance. A three-step approach is defined to generate an isochrone as the catchment area for any transport node. Results indicate that stations with a single gate along their platforms (usually on one end of them) have the potential to increase the accessibility to jobs and population by around 10% on average. Due to the walking network and land use characteristics, some stations will benefit more significantly by retrofitting a new gate. Also, four linear regression models are developed to illustrate the effect of expanded accessibility on the number of entries and exits at each station for two peak periods. Then, stations are ranked based on their added ridership, which can help authorities to prioritize the development and allocating resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Lahoorpoor, Bahman & Levinson, David M., 2020. "Catchment if you can: The effect of station entrance and exit locations on accessibility," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 82(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jotrge:v:82:y:2020:i:c:s0966692319303035
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2019.102556
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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0966692319303035
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    References listed on IDEAS

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