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Elicited vs. voluntary promises

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  • Ismayilov, Huseyn
  • Potters, Jan

Abstract

We set up an experiment with pre-play communication to study the impact of promise elicitation by trustors from trustees on trust and trustworthiness. When given the opportunity a majority of trustors solicits a promise from the trustee. This drives up the promise making rate by trustees to almost 100%. We find that elicited promises are more likely to be trusted than volunteered promises, but trustees who make an elicited promise are not more likely to be trustworthy than trustees who make a voluntary promise.

Suggested Citation

  • Ismayilov, Huseyn & Potters, Jan, 2017. "Elicited vs. voluntary promises," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 295-312.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:62:y:2017:i:c:p:295-312
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joep.2017.07.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Promises; Communication; Cooperation; Guilt aversion; Cost-of-lying; Experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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