IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/joepsy/v33y2012i1p1-7.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The material and immaterial in conflict: Spirituality reduces conspicuous consumption

Author

Listed:
  • Stillman, Tyler F.
  • Fincham, Frank D.
  • Vohs, Kathleen D.
  • Lambert, Nathaniel M.
  • Phillips, Christa A.

Abstract

Many spiritual leaders have argued that materialistic pursuits are incompatible with following a spiritual life. Consistent with this view, we found that higher levels of spirituality correspond to a decreased desire to consume material goods in a conspicuous manner. Study 1 was correlational, and found that people who reported having spiritual experiences reported a decreased desire to spend lavishly for visible consumer goods, such as a cell phone. Study 2 was experimental, and found that participants assigned to recall a spiritual event also demonstrated a decreased desire to consume conspicuously, relative to participants assigned to recall an enjoyable event.

Suggested Citation

  • Stillman, Tyler F. & Fincham, Frank D. & Vohs, Kathleen D. & Lambert, Nathaniel M. & Phillips, Christa A., 2012. "The material and immaterial in conflict: Spirituality reduces conspicuous consumption," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 1-7.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:33:y:2012:i:1:p:1-7
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joep.2011.08.012
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167487011001309
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kerwin Kofi Charles & Erik Hurst & Nikolai Roussanov, 2009. "Conspicuous Consumption and Race," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(2), pages 425-467.
    2. Wilfred Amaldoss & Sanjay Jain, 2005. "Conspicuous Consumption and Sophisticated Thinking," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 51(10), pages 1449-1466, October.
    3. Sood, James & Nasu, Yukio, 1995. "Religiosity and nationality : An exploratory study of their effect on consumer behavior in Japan and the United States," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 1-9, September.
    4. Davies, Emma & Lea, Stephen E. G., 1995. "Student attitudes to student debt," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 663-679, December.
    5. Burroughs, James E & Rindfleisch, Aric, 2002. " Materialism and Well-Being: A Conflicting Values Perspective," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(3), pages 348-370, December.
    6. Watson, John J., 2003. "The relationship of materialism to spending tendencies, saving, and debt," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 723-739, December.
    7. Kilbourne, William & Grünhagen, Marko & Foley, Janice, 2005. "A cross-cultural examination of the relationship between materialism and individual values," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 624-641, October.
    8. Wendy Wan & Chung-Leung Luk & Oliver Yau & Alan Tse & Leo Sin & Kenneth Kwong & Raymond Chow, 2009. "Do Traditional Chinese Cultural Values Nourish a Market for Pirated CDs?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 88(1), pages 185-196, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Yulei Rao & Lixing Mei & Rui Zhu, 2016. "Happiness and Stock-Market Participation: Empirical Evidence from China," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 271-293, February.
    2. Zein Muttaqin, 2019. "The Nature of Excessive Behavior (ISRAF) in the Islamic Economic Framework," GATR Journals jber169, Global Academy of Training and Research (GATR) Enterprise.
    3. Lingguo Xu & Peter E. Earl & D. S. Prasada Rao, 2019. "Materialism and Economic Progress," Discussion Papers Series 604, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    4. Strulik, Holger, 2016. "An economic theory of religious belief," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 35-46.
    5. Holger Strulik, 2016. "Secularization And Long-Run Economic Growth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(1), pages 177-200, January.
    6. Yulei Rao & Lixing Mei & Rui Zhu, 2016. "Happiness and Stock-Market Participation: Empirical Evidence from China," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 271-293, February.
    7. Guven, Cahit, 2012. "Reversing the question: Does happiness affect consumption and savings behavior?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 701-717.
    8. Samer Sarofim & Frank G. Cabano, 2018. "In God we hope, in ads we believe: the influence of religion on hope, perceived ad credibility, and purchase behavior," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 391-404, September.
    9. Lee, Seonjeong Ally & Oh, Haemoon, 2017. "Sharing travel stories and behavioral outcomes: A case of travel," Tourism Management, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 147-158.
    10. Rafi M. M. I. Chowdhury, 2018. "Religiosity and Voluntary Simplicity: The Mediating Role of Spiritual Well-Being," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 152(1), pages 149-174, September.
    11. Farah Roslan, 2018. "The Role of Policy Instruments on the Pattern of Diffusion: the Case of Solar Photovoltaic in Asia Pacific," European Journal of Economics and Business Studies Articles, European Center for Science Education and Research, vol. 4, EJES Janu.
    12. Shino Takayama & Yuki Tamura & Terence Yeo, 2019. "Primaries, Strategic Voters and Heterogenous Valences," Discussion Papers Series 605, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    13. Liang, Yinhe & Dong, Zhiyong, 2019. "Has education led to secularization? Based on the study of compulsory education law in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 324-336.
    14. Joshi, Yatish & Rahman, Zillur, 2019. "Consumers' Sustainable Purchase Behaviour: Modeling the Impact of Psychological Factors," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 235-243.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spirituality; Religion; Materialism; Conspicuous consumption; Spending;

    JEL classification:

    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:33:y:2012:i:1:p:1-7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joep .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.