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Sex differences in tax compliance: Differentiating between demographic sex, gender-role orientation, and prenatal masculinization (2D:4D)

  • Kastlunger, Barbara
  • Dressler, Stefan G.
  • Kirchler, Erich
  • Mittone, Luigi
  • Voracek, Martin

We used decision-making experiments to investigate tax compliance of women and men and focused on gender-role orientation as well as on the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal testosterone exposure. In 60 experimental periods, participants were endowed with a certain amount of money representing income and had to pay taxes. They were audited with a certain probability and fined in case of detected evasion. Both demographic sex and gender-role orientation were significantly related to tax compliance, whereas 2D:4D was not. Women and less male-typical individuals were more compliant than men and more male-typical individuals. Women and men also differed regarding their taxpaying strategies. Whereas for men audits increased subsequent evasion, women's tax payments were less affected by prior audits.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Psychology.

Volume (Year): 31 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (August)
Pages: 542-552

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Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:31:y:2010:i:4:p:542-552
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joep

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  1. Spicer, Michael W. & Hero, Rodney E., 1985. "Tax evasion and heuristics : A research note," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 263-267, March.
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  17. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521876742 is not listed on IDEAS
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