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Long live Fenerbahce: The production boosting effects of football

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  • Berument, Hakan
  • Yucel, Eray M.

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  • Berument, Hakan & Yucel, Eray M., 2005. "Long live Fenerbahce: The production boosting effects of football," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 842-861, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:26:y:2005:i:6:p:842-861
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alesina, Alberto & Sachs, Jeffrey, 1988. "Political Parties and the Business Cycle in the United States, 1948-1984," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 20(1), pages 63-82, February.
    2. Ito, Takatoshi & Park, Jin Hyuk, 1988. "Political business cycles in the parliamentary system," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 233-238.
    3. J. K. Ashton & B. Gerrard & R. Hudson, 2003. "Economic impact of national sporting success: evidence from the London stock exchange," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(12), pages 783-785.
    4. Kjetil Haugen & Arild Hervik, 2002. "Estimating the value of the Premier League or the worlds most profitable investment project," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 117-120.
    5. Dennis Coates & Brad R. Humphreys, 2002. "The Economic Impact of Postseason Play in Professional Sports," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 3(3), pages 291-299, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Gásquez & Vicente Royuela, 2014. "Is Football an Indicator of Development at the International Level?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 827-848, July.
    2. Adrian R. Bell & Chris Brooks & David Matthews & Charles Sutcliffe, 2012. "Over the moon or sick as a parrot? The effects of football results on a club's share price," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(26), pages 3435-3452, September.
    3. Ibrahim Bozkurt & Mercan Hatipoglu, 2017. "The Relationship between Parasocial breakup and Investor Behaviours," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 7(3), pages 87-96, July.
    4. Fung, Ka Wai Terence & Demir, Ender & Lau, Marco Chi Keung & Chan, Kwok Ho, 2013. "An Examination of Sports Event Sentiment: Microeconomic Evidence from Borsa Istanbul," MPRA Paper 52874, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Dennis Coates & Brad R. Humphreys, 2003. "Professional Sports Facilities, Franchises and Urban Economic Development," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 03-103, UMBC Department of Economics.
    6. Kaplanski, Guy & Levy, Haim, 2014. "Sentiment, irrationality and market efficiency: The case of the 2010 FIFA World Cup," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 35-43.

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