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Estimates of average marginal tax rates on factor incomes in Japan

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  • Gunji, Hiroshi
  • Miyazaki, Kenji

Abstract

In this paper, we estimate average marginal tax rates on factor incomes in Japan from 1963 to 2007. We adapt the method of D.H. Joines [Estimates of effective marginal tax rates on factor incomes. J. Bus. 54 (2), 191-226.] to the Japanese tax and social security system. Average marginal tax rates on labor incomes without social security premiums range from 14% to 21%, whereas the rates on incomes with social security have increased from 21% to 33%. Tax rates on capital incomes have fluctuated between 35% and 58%. We also compare our estimates with average tax rates and the wedges from business cycle accounting.

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  • Gunji, Hiroshi & Miyazaki, Kenji, 2011. "Estimates of average marginal tax rates on factor incomes in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 81-106, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jjieco:v:25:y:2011:i:2:p:81-106
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    11. Hansen, Gary & İmrohoroğlu, Selahattin, 2018. "Replacing income taxation with consumption taxation in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 15-28.
    12. Maebayashi, Noritaka, 2021. "Paces of fiscal consolidations, fiscal sustainability, and welfare: An overlapping generations approach," MPRA Paper 109059, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Gallen, Trevor S. & Winston, Clifford, 2021. "Transportation capital and its effects on the U.S. economy: A general equilibrium approach," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 69(C).
    14. Kazuki Hiraga, 2011. "How much can corporate tax reduction contribute to economic recovery, employment and feedback of tax revenue?," Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Discussion Paper Series 2011-021, Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Program.
    15. Futagami, Koichi & Konishi, Kunihiko, 2018. "Dynamic analysis of budget policy rules in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 72-88.
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    18. Selahattin Imrohoroglu, 2017. "Replacing Income Taxation with Consumption Taxation in Japan," CIGS Working Paper Series 17-008E, The Canon Institute for Global Studies.
    19. Maebayashi, Noritaka, 2021. "The pace of fiscal consolidations, fiscal sustainability, and welfare: An overlapping generations approach," MPRA Paper 112593, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Feb 2022.
    20. Maebayashi, Noritaka, 2023. "The pace of fiscal consolidations, fiscal sustainability, and welfare: An overlapping generations approach," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C).
    21. Nutahara, Kengo, 2015. "Laffer curves in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 56-72.
    22. FUKAI Taiyo & ICHIMURA Hidehiko & KITAO Sagiri & MIKOSHIBA Minamo, 2021. "Medical Expenditures over the Life Cycle: Persistent Risks and Insurance," Discussion papers 21073, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    23. Lukas Reiss & Philip Schuster, 2020. "Explaining the evolution of the Austrian implicit tax rate on labor from 1976 to 2016," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 303-341, May.
    24. Ko, Jun-Hyung, 2011. "Has the Government Lowered the Hours Worked? Evidence from Japan," MPRA Paper 30058, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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