IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jimfin/v28y2009i2p322-343.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Inter-regional and region-specific transmission of international stock market returns: The role of foreign information

Author

Listed:
  • Ibrahim, Boulis Maher
  • Brzeszczynski, Janusz

Abstract

This paper uses stochastic-parameter regressions to analyze the role of foreign information on the return equivalent of the heat wave and meteor shower hypotheses of Engle etal. [Engle, R.F., Ito, T., Lin, W., 1990 Meteor showers or heat waves? Heteroscedastic intra-daily volatility in the foreign exchange market. Econometrica 59, 525-542]. The impact of foreign information on the level and intensity of signal transmission within and between international stock markets is assessed. It is found that signals are transmitted directly from some markets to others and indirectly through other markets. Transmission across regions is stronger than within regions, but most relationships vary over time. Foreign information plays an important role, and can be used profitably in out-of-sample trading, but some stock markets are immune to the effect of information from others.

Suggested Citation

  • Ibrahim, Boulis Maher & Brzeszczynski, Janusz, 2009. "Inter-regional and region-specific transmission of international stock market returns: The role of foreign information," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 322-343, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:28:y:2009:i:2:p:322-343
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261-5606(08)00052-1
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Masih, Rumi & Masih, Abul M. M., 2001. "Long and short term dynamic causal transmission amongst international stock markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 563-587, August.
    2. Geert Bekaert & Campbell R. Harvey, 2000. "Foreign Speculators and Emerging Equity Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(2), pages 565-613, April.
    3. King, Mervyn A & Wadhwani, Sushil, 1990. "Transmission of Volatility between Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 5-33.
    4. Ito, Takatoshi & Engle, Robert F. & Lin, Wen-Ling, 1992. "Where does the meteor shower come from? : The role of stochastic policy coordination," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3-4), pages 221-240, May.
    5. François Longin, 2001. "Extreme Correlation of International Equity Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(2), pages 649-676, April.
    6. Geert Bekaert & Campbell R. Harvey & Angela Ng, 2005. "Market Integration and Contagion," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 78(1), pages 39-70, January.
    7. Pagan, Adrian R. & Schwert, G. William, 1990. "Alternative models for conditional stock volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1-2), pages 267-290.
    8. Climent, Francisco & Meneu, Vicente, 2003. "Has 1997 Asian crisis increased information flows between international markets," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 111-143.
    9. Eun, Cheol S. & Shim, Sangdal, 1989. "International Transmission of Stock Market Movements," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(02), pages 241-256, June.
    10. Reyes, Mario G., 1999. "Size, time-varying beta, and conditional heteroscedasticity in UK stock returns," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 1-10, June.
    11. Bekaert, Geert & Harvey, Campbell R., 1997. "Emerging equity market volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 29-77, January.
    12. Bollerslev, Tim & Chou, Ray Y. & Kroner, Kenneth F., 1992. "ARCH modeling in finance : A review of the theory and empirical evidence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1-2), pages 5-59.
    13. Kate Adjaoute & Martin Bruand & Rajna Gibson-Asner, 1998. "On the Predictability of the Stock Market Volatility: Does History Matter?," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 4(3), pages 293-319.
    14. Michael Melvin & Bettina Peiers Melvin, 2003. "The Global Transmission of Volatility in the Foreign Exchange Market," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 670-679, August.
    15. Harvey, Andrew & Ruiz, Esther & Sentana, Enrique, 1992. "Unobserved component time series models with Arch disturbances," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1-2), pages 129-157.
    16. Engle, Robert F & Ito, Takatoshi & Lin, Wen-Ling, 1990. "Meteor Showers or Heat Waves? Heteroskedastic Intra-daily Volatility in the Foreign Exchange Market," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(3), pages 525-542, May.
    17. Granger, Clive W.J. & Machina, Mark J., 2006. "Structural attribution of observed volatility clustering," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 135(1-2), pages 15-29.
    18. Stoll, Hans R & Whaley, Robert E, 1990. "Stock Market Structure and Volatility," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 37-71.
    19. Lin, Wen-Ling & Engle, Robert F & Ito, Takatoshi, 1994. "Do Bulls and Bears Move across Borders? International Transmission of Stock Returns and Volatility," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 7(3), pages 507-538.
    20. Hamao, Yasushi & Masulis, Ronald W & Ng, Victor, 1990. "Correlations in Price Changes and Volatility across International Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(2), pages 281-307.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:finana:v:53:y:2017:i:c:p:94-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Bartosz Gębka & Dobromił Serwa, 2012. "Liquidity needs, private information, feedback trading: verifying motives to trade," NBP Working Papers 119, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    3. Boulis Ibrahim & Janusz Brzeszczynski, 2013. "Interdependence of Stock Markets Before and After the Global Financial Crisis of 2007," CFI Discussion Papers 1305, Centre for Finance and Investment, Heriot Watt University.
    4. Gębka, Bartosz & Serwa, Dobromił, 2015. "The elusive nature of motives to trade: Evidence from international stock markets," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 147-157.
    5. Yarovaya, Larisa & Brzeszczyński, Janusz & Lau, Chi Keung Marco, 2016. "Intra- and inter-regional return and volatility spillovers across emerging and developed markets: Evidence from stock indices and stock index futures," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 96-114.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:28:y:2009:i:2:p:322-343. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30443 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.