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The housing market effects of discrete land use regulations: Evidence from the California coastal boundary zone

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  • Kahn, Matthew E.
  • Vaughn, Ryan
  • Zasloff, Jonathan

Abstract

The California coast line borders some of the most beautiful and expensive land in the entire world. The California Coastal Commission was created in 1976 to protect the coast line and to regulate land use within the coastal boundary zone. This well defined regulatory boundary offers a unique opportunity to study the consequences of land use regulation on nearby housing located in the same political jurisdiction. Using two different geocoded data sets, we document gentrification within the boundary and discuss possible explanations for these patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Kahn, Matthew E. & Vaughn, Ryan & Zasloff, Jonathan, 2010. "The housing market effects of discrete land use regulations: Evidence from the California coastal boundary zone," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 269-279, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:19:y:2010:i:4:p:269-279
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Decline of California
      by Matthew Yglesias in Moneybox on 2012-05-14 19:22:12
    2. Are Green Cities Elitist?
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2013-03-03 03:07:00
    3. The Consequences of Ideology
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-08-13 20:18:00
    4. Expensive Housing in Liberal California: Supply or Demand?
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-09-24 19:05:00
    5. The Benefits of California Coastal Development: The Case of Morro Bay
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2014-11-24 21:45:00
    6. Texas Governor Rick Perry Presents Some Solid Econ 101 Logic
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2015-07-07 01:30:00
    7. The California Coastal Commission and Housing Supply Regulation
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-02-11 20:38:00
    8. The Allocation of Scarce Resources: The Case of NBA Warriors Ticket Prices
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-06-09 00:03:00
    9. Do the Laws of Economics Hold in California?
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-06-13 20:59:00
    10. Did Coastal Local Zoning in Progressive States Caused the Trump Win? Post #2
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-11-27 21:27:00
    11. Three Thoughts About Regulation and U.S Competitiveness
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-12-10 20:38:00
    12. The Economics of One California Coastal Commission Ruling
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-02-12 00:42:00
    13. Would California be an Even Better Place to Live if Republicans had more Political Clout?
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-03-15 19:35:00
    14. Why Is There No New Housing Construction in the Desirable Venice Beach, California Area?
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-07-17 23:40:00
    15. Why is California Housing 4 Times as Expensive as Alabama Housing? Supply or Demand Revisited
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-07-18 19:50:00

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    1. repec:eee:regeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:104-115 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Guerrieri, Veronica & Hartley, Daniel & Hurst, Erik, 2013. "Endogenous gentrification and housing price dynamics," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 45-60.
    3. Gyourko, Joseph & Molloy, Raven, 2015. "Regulation and Housing Supply," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    4. Matthew E. Kahn, 2017. "Is Local Public Sector Rent Extraction Higher in Progressive Cities or High Amenity Cities?," NBER Working Papers 23201, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Joseph Gyourko & Raven Molloy, 2014. "Regulation and Housing Supply," NBER Working Papers 20536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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