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Syndicated loan spreads and the composition of the syndicate

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Listed:
  • Lim, Jongha
  • Minton, Bernadette A.
  • Weisbach, Michael S.

Abstract

During the past decade, non-bank institutional investors are increasingly taking larger roles in the corporate lending than they historically have played. These non-bank institutional lenders typically have higher required rates of return than banks, but invest in the same loan facilities. In a sample of 20,031 leveraged loan facilities originated between 1997 and 2007, facilities including a non-bank institution in their syndicates have higher spreads than otherwise identical bank-only facilities. Contrary to risk-based explanations of this finding, non-bank facilities are priced with premiums relative to bank-only facilities in the same loan package. These non-bank premiums are substantially larger when a hedge or private equity fund is one of the syndicate members. Consistent with the notion that firms are willing to pay a premium when loan facilities are particularly important to them, the non-bank premiums are larger when borrowing firms face financial constraints and when capital is less available from banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Lim, Jongha & Minton, Bernadette A. & Weisbach, Michael S., 2014. "Syndicated loan spreads and the composition of the syndicate," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 45-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:111:y:2014:i:1:p:45-69
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jfineco.2013.08.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Grupp, Marcel, 2015. "Taking the lead: When non-banks arrange syndicated loans," SAFE Working Paper Series 100, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    2. Nadia Saghi-Zedek, 2016. "Product diversification and bank performance: does ownership structure matter?," Post-Print halshs-01342528, HAL.
    3. repec:kap:jfsres:v:53:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10693-016-0243-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Grupp, Marcel, 2015. "On the impact of leveraged buyouts on bank systemic risk," SAFE Working Paper Series 101, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    5. Franke, Günter & Krahnen, Jan Pieter, 2017. "SME funding without banks? On the interplay of banks and markets," SAFE White Paper Series 44, Goethe University Frankfurt, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe.
    6. Saghi-Zedek, Nadia, 2016. "Product diversification and bank performance: Does ownership structure matter?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 154-167.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Syndicated loans; Spread premiums; Hedge funds;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill

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