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Risk and return: Long-run relations, fractional cointegration, and return predictability

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  • Bollerslev, Tim
  • Osterrieder, Daniela
  • Sizova, Natalia
  • Tauchen, George

Abstract

Univariate dependencies in market volatility, both objective and risk neutral, are best described by long-memory fractionally integrated processes. Meanwhile, the ex post difference, or the variance swap payoff reflecting the reward for bearing volatility risk, displays far less persistent dynamics. Using intraday data for the Standard & Poor's 500 and the volatility index (VIX), coupled with frequency domain methods, we separate the series into various components. We find that the coherence between volatility and the volatility-risk reward is the strongest at long-run frequencies. Our results are consistent with generalized long-run risk models and help explain why classical efforts of establishing a naïve return-volatility relation fail. We also estimate a fractionally cointegrated vector autoregression (CFVAR). The model-implied long-run equilibrium relation between the two variance variables results in nontrivial return predictability over interdaily and monthly horizons, supporting the idea that the cointegrating relation between the two variance measures proxies for the economic uncertainty rewarded by the market.

Suggested Citation

  • Bollerslev, Tim & Osterrieder, Daniela & Sizova, Natalia & Tauchen, George, 2013. "Risk and return: Long-run relations, fractional cointegration, and return predictability," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(2), pages 409-424.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:108:y:2013:i:2:p:409-424
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jfineco.2013.01.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    High-frequency data; Realized and options implied volatilities; Volatility risk premium; Long-memory and fractional cointegration; Return predictability;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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