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Signaling future actions and the potential for sacrifice

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  • Ben-Porath, Elchanan
  • Dekel, Eddie

Abstract

We consider extensions of games where some players have the option of signaling future actions by incurring costs. The main result is that in a class of games, if one player can incur costs, then forwards induction selects her most preferred outcome. Surprisingly, the player does not have to incur any costs to achieve this—the option alone suffices. However, when all players can incur costs, one player's attempt to signal a future action is vulnerable to a counter-signal by the opponent. This vulnerability to counter-signaling distinguishes signaling future actions from signaling types.

Suggested Citation

  • Ben-Porath, Elchanan & Dekel, Eddie, 1992. "Signaling future actions and the potential for sacrifice," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 36-51.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:57:y:1992:i:1:p:36-51
    DOI: 10.1016/S0022-0531(05)80039-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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