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Deterability by age

Author

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  • Bushway, Shawn
  • DeAngelo, Gregory
  • Hansen, Benjamin

Abstract

The most effective use of law enforcement resources for reducing crime has generated significant attention across law enforcement agencies, federal, state, and local decision-making committees as well as many academic disciplines. One of the more spirited discussions revolves around law enforcement agents targeting criminal activity based on a suspect's race and age. While racial profiling has received considerable attention, discussions about age-based patrolling and age-graded penalties have received much less attention. In the current analysis, we test the response, by age, of speeding on roadways (a crime that is often considered to be linked to age) to decreases in the probability of being apprehended. We find that all drivers appear to quasi-uniformly increase their speed in response to the reduced chance of being apprehended. Additionally, more egregious and seasoned offenders tend to be more responsive to fluctuations in law enforcement presence.

Suggested Citation

  • Bushway, Shawn & DeAngelo, Gregory & Hansen, Benjamin, 2013. "Deterability by age," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 70-81.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:irlaec:v:36:y:2013:i:c:p:70-81
    DOI: 10.1016/j.irle.2013.04.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Levitt, Steven D, 1997. "Using Electoral Cycles in Police Hiring to Estimate the Effect of Police on Crime," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 270-290, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. DeAngelo, Gregory, 2012. "Making space for crime: A spatial analysis of criminal competition," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 42-51.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Deterrence; Age; Law enforcement; Age-crime curve; Speeding;

    JEL classification:

    • K4 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior
    • D9 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics

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